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Same sounding words many meanings.
6

Same sounding words many meanings.

Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
The things one thinks of in the shower.

Ok, so my partner is Vietnamese, and their language is difficult to master due to one word might have five meanings depending on how it is said and in what context. Typical far eastern language.

But English as we know likes to break its own rules and have a few words that sound the same, spelt differently with different meanings.

What came to mind:

Pour
Poor
Pore
Paw

I can think of several differing meanings for those four words that basically sound identical (perhaps you are American and really push the "r" sound, but that is another conversation about "English!")

Can anyone think of some more obscure words like this?

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Raise & Raze

They are almost oposites smile

A Maintenance contract is essential, not a Luxury.
Do things on the cheap & it will cost you dear

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

>sound the same, spelt differently with different meanings

So you are looking for heterographs and homophones ...

>have a few words

I'd suggest we have more than you might think, actually.

let's see:

there, their, they’re.
here, hear
so, sew
bow, bough
peace, piece
right, rite, write, wright
there, their, they're
row, roe
flour, flower
praise, prays, preys
toad, toed, towed
seas, sees, seize
or, oar, ore

>Raise & Raze

And, of course, rays

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
Yes indeed. There are many obvious examples, but I would like to unearth some obscure ones. Although I am pretty articulate, I am always open to expanding my vocab.

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Not quite sure what you mean by obscure in this instance.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
OK, less obvious.

we know lots of them already but are there other a lot less obvious

Another obvious examples.

Reed
Read
Reid

Desert and desert.

Threw
Through

To
Too
Two

These of course are all quite simple words. Are there some other that are more complicated in their spelling. (I know I am not really explaining myself too well.)

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

I've always found it amusing to use words like this in a sentence or story.

This one is best told, rather than written:
What is a one L lama? A Tibetan priest.
What is a two L lama; llama? A Peruvian pack animal.
What is a three L lama? A helluva big fire on Boston.

Which leads me to question:
Pour
Poor
Pore
Paw

Where "paw" only sounds like poor in Boston.

I remember moving to a town in eastern Massachusetts and hearing a neighbor tell me that he had lots of patents. I thought he was an inventor. Turns out, he had patterns.

Hence These things turn upon Boston.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Yes, remember that as you travel from NJ and PA through NYC to Boston, the letter R gradually assumes the sound "h" when the "R" is not the first letter in the word.

Paahk the caah.
You aah a jehk.
Late fah wohk again.

==================================
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was - Steven Wright


RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Didn't someone post this poem not long ago? It has the opposite topic of similarly spelled words pronounced differently. I talk about the first poem on that page, but others, like "WHY ENGLISH IS SO HARD TO LEARN" are even showing words spelled and pronounced identical and still having several meanings.

And the site is another nice finding on it's own.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Bow
Bough

Then there is

Bow (as in bend forward at the waist)
Bow (as in Archery)

which brings to mind

Waist
Waste

and finally


Doe
Dough
Doh!!

Chris.

Indifference will be the downfall of mankind, but who cares?
Time flies like an arrow, however, fruit flies like a banana.
Webmaster Forum

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

These are close enough sounding:
Eminent
Imminent
Facing this eminent presence presented an imminent danger.

Affect
Effect

And more:
Ascent
Assent
I had to get his assent to make my ascent of the mountain.

Cents
Sense
Scents
It made good sense to spend a few cents to purchase flowers with different scents.

For
Fore
Four

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

I read once, I believe in Omni magizine, that there is a specific subset of these examples where the words are spelled the same yet pronounced differently with different meanings. I no longer remember the word to describe this subset but I do remember the example given as the longest word(s) of the type. There are longer words with 2 meanings such as invalid but the longest with 3 meanings is:

lather - Soap bubbles
lather - A user of the machine called a lathe
lather - A person who places lathes e.g. in lathe and plaster walls

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Quote:

or, oar, ore

Reminds me, My ex-wife would often get words confused (something to do with being unable to talk and think at the same time :) )

So we have the kiddy winks all organised, suitably attired and we are setting off for an afternoon in the local park and boating lake etc. And the other half tells the next-door neighbour that we are going 'oaring' around Stanley Park lake.

Chris.

Indifference will be the downfall of mankind, but who cares?
Time flies like an arrow, however, fruit flies like a banana.
Webmaster Forum

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
You see this is what makes our language great and interesting. keep 'em coming.

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

And if you're a poet...

or, oar, ore, o'er
O'er the ramparts we watched

Also:

Air, heir, e're
Lo, how a rose e'er blooming


RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Pale
Pail
His face turned pale as he strode beyond the pail, for what he was about to do, was beyond the pale.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Cache
Cash
Forty years ago, cache was worth a lot more cash.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

When I was in Mexico a few years back, I had an odd conversation with a local who couldn't understand why we had so many words the same, with different meanings. When I got to the bottom of it he was referring to:

sh*t
shirt
sheet

..needless to say I had to point out they were different words, pronounced slightly differently, and that he shouldn't get a sh*t confused for a shirt :)

I like work. It fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours...

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
My Brother told me when he was in a bar in Ireland, a bar tender asked if he wanted arse with that drink? My brother being my brother (obnoxious) said he definitely didn't want ASS with that. Naturally the thick Irish accent made ICE sound something like ARSE.

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

kwbMitel, the word you are looking for is homograph - and I fear Omni may have misled you. There are several examples that are longer than lather, for example:

Compound - enclosure in which workers, prisoners, soldiers are confined
Compound - composed of elements, not simple, eg compound word, chemical compound
Compound - increase or add to, as in "a large fine would only compound the level of the debt"

(there are other meanings as well, but they are mostly closely related to the second definition given above*, so probably not worth listing)

*eg to combine, mix or unite - so we might have "to compound a compound" smile

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
Ohh - yes, Compound is a great example.

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

boy as in youn mail
bouy as in marker float - but the Merkins mangle the pronounciation of that one

A Maintenance contract is essential, not a Luxury.
Do things on the cheap & it will cost you dear

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Merkins mangle the pronounciation
But we can spell it winky smile

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

red
read

I work with a lot of people from South Asia who speak a variety of the Queen's English. I often need to "indoctrinate" them regarding certain words that might be misinterpreted in the US. One recent arriving software guy told a woman on the team that he did not yet intimate that to her. I immediately performed damage control.

From dictionary.reference.com
in·ti·mate:
verb (used with object), in·ti·mat·ed, in·ti·mat·ing.
1. to indicate or make known indirectly; hint; imply; suggest.
2. Archaic. to make known; announce.

One more: About a decade ago, I had a coworker (from India) who was working on my Data Warehouse team. Until I talked with him, he was ending his e-mails to our (internal) customers with: Send your queries to me. I cautioned him that some of our user community might send him SQL to write or correct.

==================================
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was - Steven Wright


RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Quote:


Merkins mangle the pronounciation
But we can spell it winky smile

Its one of the few words you do spell corerectly winky smile

Quote (examples)


centre, colour, fibre, humour, favour

& even when you do spell then correctly you get the meaning arse about face (especialy when it comes to the word fanny smile )

However I do apologise for any mis-spellings I may have made, I am sure there are many more to come.

A Maintenance contract is essential, not a Luxury.
Do things on the cheap & it will cost you dear

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

I always liked Abbot & Costello.

the little I know about US rounders (Base ball?) comes from "Who's on first"

A Maintenance contract is essential, not a Luxury.
Do things on the cheap & it will cost you dear

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

homonyms - homographs with a variety of meanings:
Slug (n), (animal), a slow moving soft-bodied mollusk with no shell (-> sluggard, one who is sluggish),
slug (n), (metal), a metal projectile from a firearm, or a metal blank in engineering, a counterfeit coin
slug (n) a mouthful of drink from a bottle usually,
slug (n) an imperial unit of mass = 32.174049 lb or 1/12 of a blob,
slug (v) to hit, usually with a fist (-> slugger)

plus several more technical usages according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug_(disambiguation)

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

@ Strongm

No, I remember quite clearly and the name of the word type was quite complicated. You missed the requirement that the words are pronounced differently (understandable considering the rest of this thread).

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

>You missed the requirement that the words are pronounced differently

No, I did not. Indeed, my first post in this thread, where I clarified the OP's requirements was specifically about this issue.

It is true, however, that generically a homograph can also includes words with the same spelling and pronunciation that mean different things. To be super precise, the term you are looking for is heteronym, which really isn't any more complicated.

I should also point out that my example is definitely a heteronym in UK English (which is what I speak), where the emphasis shifts between the syllables, and thus the pronunciation is different for all three versions.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

@ Strongm - Although heteronym is not what I remember it does define what I am describing.

Interestingly, when I look online for lists of heteronyms, compound is very hard to find (absent from most, but not all lists). Of the 3 words you define I would pronounce 2 identically (the first 2). I can accept that this might be different in your region however. This is supported by the most comprehensive list I can find.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_het... which shows a different pronounciation in the UK.

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Quote:

lather - A user of the machine called a lathe

Actually a lathe operator is a 'turner', fourteen years in engineering and I never heard any of the Cincinnati multi-spindle lathe operators called a 'lather'. Seen quite a few get in a 'bit of a lather' if a parting off blade snapped and embedded the tip in the machine's guard cowling.

Chris.

Indifference will be the downfall of mankind, but who cares?
Time flies like an arrow, however, fruit flies like a banana.
Webmaster Forum

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

@ ChrisHirst - Agreed, it is probably a stretch but I can find that definition on heteronym websites so not that much of a stretch. As I said originally, I was not the originator of the info tidbit. I remember it as being posed as a riddle to which the answer was Lather. This, plus the timeframe and the fact that I remember it as a trusted source, leads me to the likely source as Omni magazine as they had a very entertaining brain teaser section in every issue. This is not to say that they did not make mistakes. I know I caught 2 significant (to me) errors in their answers one of which actually prompted a letter to the editor from me. I still remember that puzzle too. It was Dogs Mead and they forgot to provide the year which made the puzzle unsolvable except by trial and error. I can still remember the year (within the puzzle) accurately and was going to state it here but I just found versions of the puzzle that do not refer to the year directly so I won't spoil it for anyone who might want to look it up.

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

The 10-year Anniversary of the following, fun Making an Impression thread, thread1256-959234: Let's set a world record with this one !!!, is coming up in three months. The object of the thead/game was to identify as many Three-word Homophones as possible. We came up with more than 130 "triplets" during the life of that thread. (I won't list them all here without some sort of acclamation. wink)

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Words with two (or more) meaning can get you into trouble.

Say I want to do a web search for a rawhide strap to put on my walking stick. So I look up "leather thong". censored

I would not actually do this search as I know I can get a pair of shoe laces to solve the problem, but you get the idea.

djj
The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 23) - I need someone to lead me!

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

By the same ways, djj55

A few years ago everybody (mostly computer people) was talking ‘DSL this’ and ‘DSL that’. So I asked: “What does DSL stand for?” People started to guess. So I looked it up on the Internet. ‘Digital subscriber line’ was the second meaning of DSL. The first definition is not appropriate for the work place – trust me on this one. smile

Also, flammable and inflammable. Be careful with those two.

Have fun.

---- Andy

A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

There was once an email that went around (may still be going around as a Facebook post) with a bunch of sentences where the same spelling of a word appeared twice, but was given a different pronunciation and definition. I can't remember more than one of them at the moment, but it seems similar to what you may be after:

Quote:

He wound the bandage around the wound.

Maybe it is really from a third grade reading lesson, or something.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

These are both spelled the same and pronounced the same, yet have different meanings...

Contacts = What I put on my eyes so I can see
Contacts = My address book
Contacts = To touch something


RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Quote (SamBones)

These are both spelled the same and pronounced the same, yet have different meanings...

Sam, aren't such words simply "a word with multiple meanings"? If that is the case, then I believe that set holds the record for a single word with multiple meanings: 464.

I'm still confused on the purpose of this thread. It seems to get murkier and murkier. In the beginning, the first few posts implied that the purpose was to identify true homophones (i.e., two or more words that differ in spelling but are pronounced with the same sound(s).)

What is the current concensus so that we don't get off into the weeds?

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Yeah, I admit I didn't put a lot of effort into my post. bigsmile I had just ordered some new contact lenses and tossed it out there without really re-reading the original post.

But just to be belligerent (it is Monday)...

Contacts = Sites for electrical connections


RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Maybe we need to stick this thread on a hanger and then put the hanger in a hangar.

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Personally I find I type do instead of due but never dew.

djj
The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 23) - I need someone to lead me!

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

I see a large number of people using "your" in places that "you're" is correct (or even in place of "yore").

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Barn a large farm building used for storing grain, hay, or straw or livestock.

Barn a serious unit of area used by nuclear physicists to quantify the scattering of very small particles, such as atomic nuclei.

The name derives from the folk expression "Couldn't hit the broad side of a barn", used by particle accelerator physicists to refer to the difficulty of achieving a collision between particles.

Outhouse and Shed are even smaller units.

@ Yelworcm ... I loved the Abbott and Costello routine

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

(OP)
conehead

ACSS - SME
General Geek

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

mscallisto you need to be careful of what you're storing in an outhouse. Where I'm from it's a very different from a shed!

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Came across this question elsewhere yesterday.

Although the question was taken as facetious/rhetorical, I think it is relevant to this thread

Considering that cent and sent sound alike, which letter, s or c, would be considered silent in the word scent?

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

In misundestood song lyrics, often same sounding phrases are spanning multiple words.
For example, "Isle of.." vs "I love" can be applied to very many songs which get a whole new meaning.

A very comprehensive archive of such similar sounding phrases is available at http://www.kissthisguy.com/

Bye, Olaf.



RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Quote (Mufasa)

...I believe that set holds the record for a single word with multiple meanings: 464.

Interesting. I researched Googled that and found an article that claims "run" as the enumerated definition champ:

Quote (NY Times, May 29th, 2011, Section WK)

It took Peter Gilliver, the O.E.D. lexicographer working on the letter R, more than nine months harnessed to the duties of what Samuel Johnson once called “a harmless drudge” (plus many more months of preparatory research) to work out what he believes are all the meanings of “run.” And though some of the senses and their derivations try him — Why does a dressmaker run up a frock? Why run through a varlet with a sword? How come you run a fence around a field? Why, indeed, run this essay? — Mr. Gilliver has finally calculated that there are for the verb-form alone of “run” no fewer than 645 meanings. A record.

-----------
With business clients like mine, you'd be better off herding cats.

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

How about adding a type of anagram into the mix: If you wanted to deal with the entirety of a cave or mine that was completely religiously inspiring you would have the whole wholly holy hole...

(it's Friday, go easy on me. LOL )

Jeff
It's never too early to begin preparing for International Talk Like a Pirate Day
"The software I buy sucks, The software I write sucks. It's time to give up and have a beer..." - Me

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Then their r sum spellnig errurs that are unintentionally amusing;

https://twitter.com/JamesGShore/status/50401055011...

especially when one considers the juxtaposition of image and erroneous wording

I have enquired if he offers a alternative "gender" order service.

Chris.

Indifference will be the downfall of mankind, but who cares?
Time flies like an arrow, however, fruit flies like a banana.
Webmaster Forum

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

So, you want homophones...?

Buy
By
Bye
Bi (polar)

Course
Coarse
Corse
Cores (per socket)

Mack (Trucks)
Mc (Donalds)
MAC (Apple)
Mac (-Beth)
Mach (speed of sound)
Mak (Flower)

Faq
F*ck
Fock (quantum mechanics)
Foque (sail)

To
Too
Two
Tue

Verses
Versus

Kind regards

Gunnar
__________________________________________________________________
Hippos have bad eyesight, but considering their weight, it’s hardly their problem

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

Interesting... In my poor, country-boy dialect, I pronounce cores with a "z" sound on the end and mach with an "ah" sound instead of an "'a" sound (like apple). I also pronounce FAQ with an "'a" sound, too.

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

There are three ways to pronounce Mach:)
Ma-ch /mɑːx/
Ma-ak /mɑːk/
Mac /mæk/

Kind regards

Gunnar
__________________________________________________________________
Hippos have bad eyesight, but considering their weight, it’s hardly their problem

RE: Same sounding words many meanings.

I'm on a very large project. We have been having many tests of our "Go Live"; these tests are called Mocks. Of course, when we reached Mock 5, I couldn't resist frequent comments about Speed Racer's car: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mach_Five

Of course many of the younger people had no idea what I was talking about.

==================================
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was - Steven Wright


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