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Profiled computers using Windows 95

Profiled computers using Windows 95

Profiled computers using Windows 95

(OP)
Can anyone give me any tips on how to profile computers in Windows 95. I have a group of users who spend more time changing their colors and display resolution than doing any work. I would like to profile those computers so that they do not have the option to access applications other than those related to their work, Grinch that I am ;-). I would like to do a system profile, but unsure how to go about it. Any suggestions, tips, books, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

RE: Profiled computers using Windows 95

Windows 95 is such a low-key, low-end security type system, it is virtually impossible to stop any user from doing things within Windows. One example of this was when I went to my local public library and found them running a network, through windows 95. The network ran through a small program that allowed users to access the internet to find just books. Using simple generally known key combinations I was able to access the rest of the internet very easily. Basically while Windows 95 is a very useful operating system for homes, security in the workplace is not one of its better qualities.

RE: Profiled computers using Windows 95

The Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 95 Resource Manuals give some pretty good instructions on editing and applying logon scripts and direct applied Registry edits, as well as the NT lock down features to restrict access to many parts of a workstation. You can limit access from the floppy drives to the Network Neighborhood icons. A logon script can contain all the settings and icons you wish to have on a W/S desktop, then just disable the Properties menu items for the Display - this should certainly slow them down in goofing around!

RE: Profiled computers using Windows 95

If you're coming off an NT server, you might try using POLEDIT.EXE. This will let you lock down the machines so that the users can only do certain things. We use it here at the college, and it does a nice job. This is the NT lockdown that 291er refers to.

RE: Profiled computers using Windows 95

Or, a better way, obtain a good registry tricks resource....I downloaded one a few months ago and have found it endlessly usefull in locking down SEVERAL Win9x machines; one key you may be extremely interested in is:
[HKEY_USERS/.Default/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Policies/Explorer] there are MANY different lock-downs that can be applied from there.
(e-mail me if you want me to upload a copy of my regisrty info file to a mutually accessable 'net locale for you dto download it fo your own use)

-Robherc
robherc@netzero.net

*nix installation & program collector/reseller. Contact me if you think you've got one that I don't :-)

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