×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR COMPUTER PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you a
Computer / IT professional?
Join Tek-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Tek-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Teaching NT

Teaching NT

Teaching NT

(OP)
I have taught an introduction to Operating Systems which was supposed to be a theoretical course in the main. I decided to approach the course from a practical point of view and I basically relied heavily on my notes on "Administering NT 4". I supplemented this with some "Core technologies" stuff. I now have to give the second term of this subject and am wondering are there any suggestions for what would be useful. The students are studying for a Certificate in Computer and IT support.

RE: Teaching NT

I don't know how in depth you are planning to take the class, but at least a basic explaination of TCP/IP would be extremely helpful.

RE: Teaching NT

You may take a look at the academic version of the MOC courses. If you're looking for topics that would be good for beginners to cover, I would think about the following:

RAS
TCP/IP
Printing
Basic Troubleshooting
ERDs and use
Unattended Installs

If you're looking for more advanced topics I would recommend:

Registry
Security
Interconnectivity with Novel/Unix

RE: Teaching NT

You might also consider DNS / lmhosts.

RE: Teaching NT

Look at including the following:
Multi-Domain Models
Migrating from Netware to NT
RAS
TCP/IP (Intro/Mid-Level)
Internet Info Server

RE: Teaching NT

Have each student install NT server (PDC,BDC), NT workstation, Win95/98 on 4 blank computers, make sure they can prepare the systems from scratch, install DHCP, share directorys and drives, map drives,create users/groups, promote BDC to PDC, make rdisk floppys, rotate the 4 machines with different hardware
to act as server, workstation etc to maximize configuration experience, then erase hard drives, and start over..., after several installs, have them add/share printers, configure a dialup internet provider, etc.

RE: Teaching NT

also throw in things like asking how to "promote" from member to PDC/BDC (usually an exam question).
Installing printers with the relevant client OS installers on the server using IP, DLC and Macintosh (if applicable).
What is DHCP and how does it work.
IP and subnet masks.
BOOT.ini.

RE: Teaching NT

When I teach people about Windows NT Workstation, Server, and Small Business Server, I make sure they have an in depth understanding about the basics of Windows NT, such as the explorer and how to use it, as well as the differences between Windows NT and Windows 9x. Then I go into TCP/IP, and the rest of the important protocols, making sure to keep TCP/IP the most important. I then go into RAS as well DHCP. I try and give them a better understanding of networking, since Windows NT is such a good networking OS. I show them how to install proxy, dns, and gateways. I then go into NT Server administration, showing them how users can connect to the server and access files. I show them how to setup shares, and how to setup permissions. I explain everything I can using words, then actually show them things after using computers.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Tek-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Tek-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Tek-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Tek-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Close Box

Join Tek-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical computer professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Tek-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close