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CATV and Broadband setup

CATV and Broadband setup

CATV and Broadband setup

(OP)
I am in the process of installing a CATV(comcast) broadband connection. I have 3 TV's currently on the cable which were installed in the house upon construction.  The runs are about 50', 50' and 30'. They are on what looks like builders grace COAX. I hooked them up with a 5 jack (1 in 3 out and one unused)splitter from Radio Shack and all was fine. I just ran about 50' of quad insulated coax from the open splitter port to where my cable modem will be and 2 of the the 2 TV sets with the 50' runshad noticible deterioration of the picture(some wavy lines, some fuzziness or snow). I tried switching the lines around on the splitter and it got a little better, but still not as it used to be. I also hooked a TV to the line which will serve the modem to check the signal and it was ok, but not great. Suggestions appreciated .  Thanks

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

Be sure you have at minimum a 1 ghz splitter , and try not to leave any ports on the splitter open.Signal can leak from this open port,and cause bad reception.You may also want to check your fittings on the end of the cable runs.Try this configuration : Connect the service provider's line that enters the house to a 2-way splitter (1 in, 2 out),with the service provider's line in the in position. Take your Rg-6 Quad for your broadband modem to one of the ports on the 2-way.Now,take a short RG-6 jumper (8 in. or so)from the other port on the 2-way to the in port on a 3-way splitter (1 in , 3 out).Insert coax runs for the TV's in the 3 ports available.Be sure these are tight. This config should help you out.

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

First things first,if it has anything at all to do with voice data or video, DO NOT buy jack from R.S. I'm dead serious. Try to find a R.S. employee that really has answers, good luck, they are the guys that are still selling satin cable for ethernet etc.(ignorance is ignorance!) \
Second, when dealing with broadband apps. always use Hi Frequency distribution components, this will make or break your project and might unwittingly bring you to the conclusion that you have a cable issue when it aint so.
Third, when using Quad Shield, make sure that every single piece of cable, every patch cable etc., is Quad!! Use the best connectors you can get (no thread ons, no hex crimp!) This will help insure that you have a balanced network. Also cap any unterminated ports with a 75 ohm terminator to keep the network balanced and prevent RF leaks.
The list goes on.
Hope this makes sense and assists you.
Darryl

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

What's wrong with Hex crimps ?  

anthony

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

In reply to hex crimps Amphenol is the only decent hex crimp connector that I have worked with. They have a wide variety of quality hex crimps to suit many apps.
In regard to field terminations, most hex crimps that I have worked with do not sufficiently grab the cable. I have performed dozens and dozens of service calls where the cable had creeped or been pulled out of hex crimp enough to interupt service yet still appear intact, they pull out to easy in general. Unless you are in the call back business I would avoid them in general.
Radial compression and SnapLok connectors provide a much superior termination, superior weather proofing and prove to provide superior performance when sweep testing.. Although sufficient for CATV, you will often experience problems using hex crimps for satellite, almost always when used for broadband, and especially when used outdoors. Don't even try to use hex crimp for component level connections, the only good field termination product I have seen for this app. is SnapnSeal.

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

Also watch out for those damn O-rings. If not torqued almost to the breaking point, they consistently result in intermittent connections. Tis my experience. .

RE: CATV and Broadband setup

I had a O-ring type crimp before and I didn't like it so I just recently bought a Hex type.  And yes I did also notice that the wire can pull out.  It wasn't worth it to purchase the SnapnSeal tool for me because it's a home application use, I'm not doing the setup for customers only for my own home.  Also I rarely change my wiring configuration once everything is setup.

thanks for the info VSATECH

Anthony

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