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Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

(OP)
My home network is based on 192.168.X.X, like most default router setups. I already have many devices on my home network which have been assigned static IP addresses on this network, so I don't want to mess with that.

Unfortunately, now that I am working at home with my work computer, I have learned that one of the software programs I have relies on my private static work IP address which is of the form 10.XX.X.XX. I cannot change that in the software because of the way it is licensed at this point.

Is there a way that I can configure my Windows 10 PC, or my router (or my router which is acting as a repeater in my basement office) to think my PC has the 10.XX.X.XX IP address and still talk with the rest of my home network (ie. print, get on the internet, etc)?

Thanks,
J

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

Your home network does not need static IP addresses as your router will provide DHCP.
You can change your DHCP scope to the 10.x.x.x range which will fit in with your licenced device.

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

(OP)
I realize that my home network doesn't NEED static IP addresses, but it is already set up with multiple devices, remote access, etc which is based on static IP and I don't wan't to undo all of that to change my IP address range, so I was hoping there was another way.

Thanks,
J

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

You could get an old domestic router, set it up on the LAN side with a 10 range and connect it to your main 192 router.

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

Not sure if your alternate address machine will need outside access so:
You could add a network card and set it up to respond to the alternate address. You'll have no external connections through the router.
Easiest would be to change the IP address when you need to use the work computer than back to the original when you want external access. Work computer won't have outside access.
Have in the past set up 2 routers with different networks running in parallel with switches on both sides so the LAN was carrying traffic for both and allowing external access for both.

Ed Fair
Give the wrong symptoms, get the wrong solutions.

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

(OP)
@edfair I need external access from the work computer as well.

@sbcsu I thought I could leave my basement router set up as an access point connected to my main router, but change to a static IP on the access point with a 10.XX.X.XX address, but I guess those 2 ideas are mutually exclusive because I couldn't get access to the other router from there. Can you explain more detail about how I should configure? Do I leave DHCP on but put the main router as the DNS? I've had to reset my basement router a few times so I think I need to understand more before I try to reconfigure it again.

Thanks,
J

RE: Can I have a different private IP address which isn't on my router's subnet?

You can have 2 'domestic' routers.
Router One is directly connected to your internet provider.
It has an internal range of 192.168.x.x

The Internet port on Router 2 is connected to a LAN port 2 on Router One.
Router Two has an internal range of 10.x.x.x

DHCP does not matter if you have a fixed IP device connected.
You do not need to use DHCP as you know.
Example: You can log on to router 2 and tell it a small DHCP range of say 10.1.2.50 to 60
And leave your licenced device set to 10.1.2.40 (outside of the DHCP range)

You need to 'tell' router 1 that there is a route to the 10.x.x.x range and that it can be reached via LAN port number 2

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