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Where are you at?

Where are you at?

Where are you at?

(OP)
This drives me up the wall: “Where are you at?”

I hear it at work, and on the phone. Used to be simple – you know when you called somebody you knew where they were – by the phone you’ve just dialed. Not anymore. They can be anywhere. But why add the ‘at’ at the end? “Where are you?” is enough. Not to mention we should not end the sentence with the preposition, right?

Is it only the US Midwest phenomena, or do you have it were you are (at)?


---- Andy

There is a great need for a sarcasm font.

RE: Where are you at?

Worse yet, "Where you at?" (I'm a poet sans purpose)

Is it not merely sufficient to ask, "Where are you?"

Skip,

glassesJust traded in my OLD subtlety...
for a NUance!tongue

"The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible" A. Einstein

RE: Where are you at?

It started in the inner cities and spread from there via TV and movies. It's now everywhere.

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Where are you at?

Yeah, my family prefers the "Where you at?" variant. Sometimes spelled "wr u at" (no question mark).

I like to reply "at = aisle 7" (or wherever I happen to be).

I see something like "wr u at" as linguistic assembly language.

RE: Where are you at?

(OP)
I can sort of understand shortcuts in texting (although since I don't have a cell phone, it does not apply to me), but in spoken English...?


---- Andy

There is a great need for a sarcasm font.

RE: Where are you at?

Where am I at? I'm right here, you're talking to me. Oh, Oh, were you talking about a status update?

==================================
advanced cognitive capabilities and other marketing buzzwords explained with sarcastic simplicity


RE: Where are you at?

Can you give me your 10-20? smile

RE: Where are you at?

Wr U @

Skip,

glassesJust traded in my OLD subtlety...
for a NUance!tongue

"The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible" A. Einstein

RE: Where are you at?

As a non-native speaker, I understood "Where are you at" as asking what you're currently doing (or what's next on your list), so more specifically not only asking whether someone has time but also seeing, whether your concern is more important, specifically in business calls.

I know that is rather said as "What are you at?" or "What are you up to?" and in both cases no "Where" question, but what do I know what's really formally correct.

Bye, Olaf.

Olaf Doschke Software Engineering
https://www.doschke.name

RE: Where are you at?

where are yo bassed ok but where are yo at is horrible (and bassed may not give current location)
actually what's your current location would be quite good


Do things on the cheap & it will cost you dear

RE: Where are you at?

In some way I'm open to a creative way of merging "Where are you?" and "What are you at?", if it was about that.

It seems not, but there isn't only taste freeze in music but also in language taste and I begin to see that for myself and not just now. Even ironically I never used "Yo" or other such slang words.

But just a reminder:
https://xkcd.com/1108/

That likely won't change all feelings about language changes you're not comfortable with and it's okay to notice and remark and offer better ways, especially if it's so much simpler to ask the one or other question or both.

The pros and cons of a phone call conversation would become blatantly visible, if you ever saw a transcription of a call you had if that were a mail you'd likely not read it or put it off for later, even just a 3-minute call. And yet, for my profession as developer telling something often includes information you better get in written form to copy&paste.

So people more used to shortened written communication including messaging or even social media posts would stick to that even in a call. And that's causing a shortcoming of well-formulated language, i.e. whole sentences, I agree to that aspect very generally.

So perhaps a piece of good advice if something bothers you is simply politely asking "Could you repeat what you just said in a whole sentence?"

Bye, Olaf.

Olaf Doschke Software Engineering
https://www.doschke.name

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