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Literally is no longer Literally
2

Literally is no longer Literally

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

I disagree with the decision to amend the definition in this way. People used it as hyperbole that's always been why its used in that circumstance. If that's the reason then we have to add all hyperbolic uses of words to the dictionary definition and that's a very slippery slope.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

My head literally exploded (according to the new definition).

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

I littoraly want to stick my head in the sand.

-- Francis
Francisus ego, sed non sum papa.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Did you read the article below the video?

Actually there is no ham in hamburger.

The hamburger comes from the german city Hamburg and this name is derived from the castle Hammaburg, in which Hamma comes from old german "Hamme" or "Hamm", which describes a certain landscape including a hill, forest and marshland. That aside a burger also is not another word for a meat patty or the whole thing, but comes from german burg, which translates to castle.

So literally there is no ham in hamburger, and no Burg.

All derived burger names like cheeseburger are a joke in itself, but if it was named by the ingredients it would need to be called Beefburger.

The sad thing is, even Hamburgers would tell you ham comes from ham as in bacon/pork/meat. The history of this snack is lost and it has become a native American thing.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Yes, and Frankfurter is from Frankfurt, and Weiner is from Vienna - which city is it, really?

-- Francis
Francisus ego, sed non sum papa.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

I thought that the name Hamburger (the pattie) derived from "Hamburg Steak" which was chopped/minced and shaped beef which was then cooked like a steak would be. The bun came later.

Link

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

With a nod to FIOL for providing this most recently.

thread1256-1713887: Perhaps it's time to Fry the pedants.....

The tack I take with things like this is to simply not use it.

It falls in the same catagory (for me) as:
- needless to say
- irregardless

Next up is the word Ironic (any bets?) I think it will soon be redefined as any unexpected or unfortunate outcome (as that is how it is used)

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

2
Why is the English language changing to accommodate the lowest common denominator. You know your in trouble when society has to change it self so the people who cant use words correctly don't feel "left out". Very confusing.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

(OP)
==> Why is the English language changing to accommodate the lowest common denominator.
Idiocracy

==> The tack I take with things like
So what's your point? smile

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RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Quote (Kozar)

You know your in trouble when society has to change it self so the people who cant use words correctly don't feel "left out".

So, Kozar, do you feel "left out" here on MAI? <grin>

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Whoa! Serious Burn. Ironic? Yup, passes my litmus test. (Add extra Irony for using Ironic after my comment above)

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Quote (SantaMufasa)

So, Kozar, do you feel "left out" here on MAI? <grin>

I will be the first to admit my spelling and grammar are far from perfect. However I do pride my self on using words correctly in regards to their definition. The exception of course being hyperbole which is what they took away from people by amending the definition of literally.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

@CajunCenturion - Missed your reply earlier.

Pun or critique re: Tack.

That is definitely an expression I use a lot. If it is incorrect, I would like to know (literally)

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

(OP)
I think instead of the word "tack", I think you mean "tact". I took it as simple typo, but one which left itself open for the pun.


--------------
Good Luck
To get the most from your Tek-Tips experience, please read
FAQ181-2886: How can I maximize my chances of getting an answer?
Wise men speak because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something. - Plato

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

I was using tack as in the sailing term where one adjusts to sail against the wind.

A lot of people mistake the term as tact

http://grammar.about.com/od/alightersideofwriting/...

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

A vote in support of kwbMitel here. I use "tack" in the same way, a sailing term meaning the direction I've chosen to go, usually against the prevailing winds. Tacking is a sailing tactic.

bigsmile

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

> Weiner is from Vienna - which city is it, really?
Vienna is in Austria and the native name is Wien, that's the city name. And it's caleld Wiener in Austria and germany, not Weiner.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Basking in the glory, Thanks Sambones (it's so rare that I'm right, that I'm literally speechless)

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Quote (KozarTech)

You know your in trouble when society has to change it self so the people who cant use words correctly don't feel "left out".

Sadly I agree; have a star for pointing that out.

Sam

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Quote (KozarTech)

You know your in trouble when society has to change it self so the people who cant use words correctly don't feel "left out".

Bearing in mind JohnHerman's signature block in this very forum:

Quote (JohnHerman Signature Block)

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. - George Bernard Shaw

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Is this the same G.B. Shaw?
Shaw admired not just Stalin, but Mussolini and even Hitler.[24] He despised freedom, writing, "Mussolini... Hitler and the rest can all depend on me to judge them by their ability to deliver the goods and not by... comfortable notions of freedom."[25]

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

You might be happy to hear (or not) that the English language is not the only one deteriorating due to the 'no dummy left behind" policies of our times.
German (I know that one for sure) has scrapped the sharp S (ß) like in Straße (now Strasse) because it was only used for some but not all words and people (some) could not remember which ones.
The solution was again to take the dumbest person and see how they can accommodate them and they made the ß disappear and replaced it wit ss.
This seems to be a phenomenon in the western world to make all bend by some minorities request or needs, not only in the language though.
So much for democracy ("rule of the people") where the majority dictates the happenings. Depressing at times.

Joe W.

FHandw, ACSS (SME), ACIS (SME)

http://convergednetworks.ca


Interrupt the silence only if you improve it by saying something, otherwise be quiet and everybody will be grateful.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Westi,

good point, but the ß is not totally gone from German. What puzzles me most is, it is removed in the perhaps most famous word containing ß, the daß. Now it's dass.

But the ß ligature is still in use, see here: http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa092898.ht...
And Straße is a bad example, as it's still written with ß.

The overall phenomenon is true nevertheless. Germany had an orthography reform in 1996, which went into force in 1998 and a final revision is in force since 2006. See http://german.about.com/library/blreform.htm

And the overall reasoning was to not leave 'dummmies' behind, true. Some even say Germany wanted to get a better rank in the Pisa evaluation of international school systems.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

I have not been in Germany since 2000 and had to rely on my parents information, which was apparently incomplete.

for some reason I think the old way was easier but that is probably because I grew up with it. I feel for the teachers that have to adapt to this and teach it properly to the new students and correct the students that had studied it 'wrong" for the last years.

I think I stay with English in written form and just speak the German as you can't hear the difference smile

Joe W.

FHandw, ACSS (SME), ACIS (SME)

http://convergednetworks.ca


“Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives.”

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Wish you could literally do this?

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

BTW.... everything has been shortened by texting... dbl + good new speak CU L8r~~!!~~ Just trying out the new speak taught by our Gov't "Department of Education".... and remembering what a good year 1984 was... hourglass

Think twice, speak once~~!!~~

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

Quote:


BTW.... everything has been shortened by texting... dbl + good new speak CU L8r~~!!~~

H8 that, dont u?
reindeer

RE: Literally is no longer Literally

<Why is the English language changing to accommodate the lowest common denominator

Television

An unforeseen consequence of the information revolution has been the exponential propagation of human error.

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