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14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

(OP)
http://tinyurl.com/clp3sxq

Have you ever tartled?

**********************************************
What's most important is that you realise ... There is no spoon.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Coo - doesn't include sgriob (or even Torschlusspanik) ...

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

And the reverse please, what is the equivalent (in any language) of moreish - when someone cooks something so delicious that you want another, and another or even more helpings?

When about 14+ years old, we used to enjoy the company of 'tartlets' to the extent of following them around, with my compadres - could you describe that as tartled?

A favourite of one of my lecturers in Information Studies was 'Weltanschauung' or 'world-view'.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

From German comes Sitzfleisch, which translates literally as sit-flesh, and figuratively as the ability sit for hours doing one thing when you really could be up and about doing a million others.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Well, actually the idiom "having much Sitzfleisch" means being very patient, persistent and steady, to bear something, or - as you also say - to sit something out. It doesn't necessarily mean to only do one thing, it doesn't even need to literally mean sitting at all.

"Sitzfleisch" on it's own can also simply describe the buttocks in a colloquial, yet only slightly uncouth way.

Moreish, hmm, no, the german for that would be, "that tastes like more", which you could say to the cook, to indicate you want more.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

"Sitzfleisch" is "Arsed", as in "I couldn't be arsed to post the letter." - I could not be motivated to (get up off my backside to" post the letter. "I arsed about all day." - I did nothing of any consequence, I wasted time. "Half-arsed" - without any effort to do the thing properly.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Nope. Sitzfleisch is not "arsed".
Sitzfleisch means something like endurance, stamina, with the difference that it is not used in the context of physical exercise of any kind but of mental or verbal exercise which requires you to sit through hours of meetings or in study.

“Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.” (Kofi Annan)
Oppose SOPA, PIPA, ACTA; measures to curb freedom of information under whatever name whatsoever.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

If flyboytim knows it as arsed, it may also mean Germans and English do use the same term differntly. If it's a synonym to not being bothered it has a totally different meaning than in germany.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Hi Olaf - you are missing the negative - in "Could not be arsed", Arsed is the antonym to not being bothered, not the synonym.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

How about the English word for 'Bon Appetit'? Ok, that's French and two words, but in Polish it is Smacznego - one word. You can say: Have a good meal, but that's many words.

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Red necks have a two word saying for 'Bon Appetit' - Dig in!

djj
The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 23) - I need someone to lead me!

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

In France you can say "I am very hungry!" with just two letters: G a (j'ai grand appétit) ;)

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

So is that why everyone thinks that fat Frenchmen like Lady Gaga?bigsmile


I know bad joke. sadeyes

djj
The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 23) - I need someone to lead me!

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Off Topic, but I think it's at least I know why chinese like Lady Gaga. When they hear the old Queen song Radio Gaga, they sing along: "All we heal is Lady Oh Gaga".

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

In my opinion, English and American English in particular lacks a lot of the finesse that many other languages have when it comes to expressiveness and having words to convey meaning. I can think of a couple of examples, one German, one Spanish, but seeing as they are both profane I am not going to mention them here.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Hiraeth - Welsh

Meaning a longing for home that homesickness doesn't quite cover.

For example - I left Wales some years ago and have a home in Yorkshire. If I am homesick, I am homesick for god's wonderful county. If I am feeling "hiraeth" I am yearning for Wales.

It is rare that I feel "hiraeth", but after 25 years I still do on occasion!

Take Care

Matt
I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone.
My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

mox nix, same difference...

Quote:

Red necks have a two word saying for 'Bon Appetit' - Dig in!
and here I thought it was "hoe-down"...

Quote:

So is that why everyone thinks that fat Frenchmen like Lady Gaga?
nope, it's because of the meat-dress...

Quote:

I left Wales some years ago and have a home in Yorkshire.
Poor fella... ;)

PS: take all with a grain of salt...

Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Quote (BadBigBen)

take all with a grain of salt...

Is that if you want to ‘season to taste’? smile

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

@BBB

I had to laugh at your "mox nix" reference from the idiom "macht nichts" or "makes no difference".

The last time I used the term mox nix was in Germany from 19962-1965 when we commonly referred to the automobile turn signals that were "semaphore styled"; a little arm like device flipped out from either the left or right side of the car to indicate turn direction.

The problem was they almost never withdrew after the turn ergo we never knew which way the person was intending to go, thus was born "mox nix sticks".

I hope they've done away with them!!

Sam

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

I think english might be world language because it's simpler than other languages, but I remember many things you can't really translate 1:1

For example, even if we have about the same similarity of right as the direction and being right and rights as terms of correctness and lay, that's not true about left and being left, and so the Elvis song title "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone" is something quite untranslatable.

And here's another blog entry I found while googling, if "untranslatable" is the correct word:

http://io9.com/5905257/10-untranslatable-words-and-when-youll-want-to-use-them

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Quote (Olaf)

I think english might be world language because it's simpler than other languages.

Sorry Olaf, but I believe that English is as difficult to learn as perhaps Japanese, Chinese (i.e., Mandarin and Cantonese), and just slightly less complex than Navajo <grin>. When you consider that the letters "ough" have at least 7 different pronunciations in English depending upon what other letters you put in front of, or in back of, "ough", that's a clue of how "clueless" English is.

The easiest (spoken) languages to learn, IMHO, are Spanish and Esperanto. Both languages are extremely consistent/regular in their pronunciations and very regular in their construction and grammar.

The reason that English is the "world" language is because anyone wishing to be successful in international business and technology must speak and understand English.

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Hello Mufasa,

I can follow your reasoning, and you are most probably very correct. But it's not only the business, another driving force most probably is music and lyrics.

I cannot talk much about other languages than German - my mother tongue - and English. I have tried to learn Spanish a bit, but soon gave up. I also had the dead language Latin in school, but wasn't very successful at it. I can see how Esperanto is more logical structured and less historically grown, as it's a constructed language.

If the world language would be defined by the number of persons speaking it, it would be Chinese, and from the top of my head, without referring to Google or Wikipedia, I think the next most frequently spoken language is Spanish, followed perhaps by Frensh, at least when you consider the official languages. The disadvantage with Chinese of course is, it's almost not spoken outside of China. And a non Latin alphabet is a hurdle.

Overall I don't disagree, but at least my personal experience differs very much. I tend to see myself as untalented in learning languages, but still have managed to feel very fine with English.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

==>If the world language would be defined by the number of persons speaking it, it would be Chinese
There are lots of different ways to rank the various languages.
You can rank based as a first language of native speakers, or as a first language of actual speakers. You can add to that the use of the language as a secondary language. In other words, how many speak <insert language> as either a first or second language. Or you can extend that to the total number of people fluent, spoken and/or written, for a given language. You can factor in the number of countries in which that language is spoken, and/or whether it's a "legal" language for the conduct of business. It's difficult to agree or disagree with any language ranking without first understanding the ranking criteria.

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RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Sorry, Cajun, I didn't specify more exact what I mean with persons speaking a language. You're totally right it depends. So? I was overall just describing my feelings towards this, nothing based on numbers, statistics, whatever.

Bye, Olaf.

RE: 14 wonderful words with no English equivalent

Quote (mscallisto)

I hope they've done away with them!!
Having been born in 1966, I have never seen them, except in the US on old (ancient/antique) cars...

Quote (mscallisto)

I had to laugh at your "mox nix"
I thought that would get someone to reminisce... actually, that was quite often used by US soldiers back in the 70's and 80's (of last century), always had me chuckling...

Quote (Santa)

The reason that English is the "world" language is because anyone wishing to be successful in international business and technology must speak and understand English.
It is the World language, due to the fact that the British had so many different colonies around the world, where the top economic power in the 19th Century to be replaced by the USofA in the 20th Century... So watch out soon we all will be either talking Hindi or Mandarin-Chinese... ;)

Quote (Olaf)

I tend to see myself as untalented in learning languages, but still have managed to feel very fine with English.
Und dein Englisch ist sehr gut... (and your English is pretty good...)
Not everyone is talented language-wise... ;)

Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

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