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Literally Wrong
2

Literally Wrong

Literally Wrong

(OP)
I don't know why people who should know better keep doing this.
In this article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-20176376 the researcher from the Mackintosh School of Architecture (only in Glasgow) says about people drying their laundry in their houses:

Quote:

Some were literally decorating the house with it...
NO THEY WEREN'T!
The fact that this is a quote from (I assume) an academic source makes it even more unacceptable.
I am literally fuming!

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally Wrong

Apparently it can be used informally for emphasis while not being literally true:
I have received literally thousands of letters

Source: http://oxforddictionaries.com

There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.

RE: Literally Wrong

(OP)
Quite, but...

Quote (Oxford Dictionaries Online)

...not acceptable in formal contexts...
and I consider an academic research report to be somewhat formal.

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally Wrong

Good point, well made thumbsup2

There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote:

I consider an academic research report to be somewhat formal.
but it was not written in the research report. BBC talked to the person conducting the research, and she said it to them (at least that is how I read it), thus it is in informal context and quite acceptable...


Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

RE: Literally Wrong

I literally agree with literally all of the above. It literally is so extraneous to literally qualify literally everything with the word "literally", irregardless of whether it is literally in a literally informal or a literally formal document.

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally Wrong

Jamie Redknapp likes to literally use the word to death:

"that cross to Rooney was literally on a plate"

"Barca literally passed Arsenal to death"

"centre forwards have the ability to make time stand still. And when Chopra got the ball, it literally did just that"

My personal favourite:

"he had to cut back inside on to his left, because he literally hasn't got a right foot"

There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.

RE: Literally Wrong

turkeyturkeyPeople sure are using literally liberally.

I keep trying to do something about my procrastination but I keep putting it off until tomorrow.

RE: Literally Wrong

Please don't stop people using "literally" literally all the time. They'll only switch to my next pet hate which is the repetion of "really" to provide emphasis. I literally really, really hate that, you know? like it really really bugs me when they use the rising inflection end to a sentence?

Chris

Someday I'll know what I'm donig...damn!

RE: Literally Wrong

Mine is the word ‘like’. For some reason used A LOT by high school girls, mostly (does it make me a sexist?) Take this one word away from their vocabulary and I am sure they will not be able to communicate, like, literally, at all.

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: Literally Wrong

Well, it won't be too much longer until all our worries about proper English will be gone because written English (and other languages) is disappearing and is being replaced with leet and text speak. Cursive is already dead.

Jim

RE: Literally Wrong

Andy, your comment about not communicating brought back a memory. Many years ago, a friend was talking to another person. This friend liked to use his arms/hands while talking. I came up behind him and held his arms down. He could not talk!

djj
The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 23) - I need someone to lead me!

RE: Literally Wrong

I just came back from central Europe where I have noticed very interesting phenomenon: two people (guys) were talking using ONLY swear words, profanities, in their conversation, no other words were spoken. And the interesting part was – they understood each other! Amazing!

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: Literally Wrong

Andy made me realize that "literally", as we used it above, is just as extraneous and virtually in the same category as any other profanity. To test this out, I read through the above posts, substituting the word "literally" with any other profanity that ends with "-ing".

This demonstrates how lacking in originality and purpose "literally" is.

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote (Andrzejek)

Mine is the word ‘like’. For some reason used A LOT by high school girls, mostly (does it make me a sexist?) Take this one word away from their vocabulary and I am sure they will not be able to communicate, like, literally, at all.

I live in California and was riding the train up the coast a couple weeks ago. At one stop two college girls got on and sat behind my wife and I. Not a single sentence came out of either of their mouths that didn't have multiple "like"s sprinkled throughout.

I started trying to keep count just to pass the time. That was near impossible since they were both pretty much talking over each other, so I would just focus on one at a time. As best I could count, one girl was at about 30% "likes". Her companion was easily up to 40% to 45%. The longest string of words without a "like" that I heard from either one of them was 6 words.

But I really started to laugh when I started noticing how the word "like" altered the meaning, it was sometimes pretty funny. One girl's father was "from like California". Ok, so he's not from California, but some place that's just like California.

The real confusion was when they started sprinkling the word "like" into discussions of things they hated. "I really like hate that".

I enjoyed the heck out of it even though my wife kept elbowing me. It really made the time pass quickly.

bigsmile

RE: Literally Wrong

...And have you noticed that "like" has taken on the meaning of "said" or "says":

Quote:

I'm like, "Don't do that."

And he's like, "I can if I want."

And I'm like, "Only if you want my fist in your face."

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally Wrong

I did. But in their defense, little bits of the conversation were showing hints of intelligence. The weekend before was a different story.

The train is called the Surfliner and runs along the rugged California coast. It's an absolutely beautiful scenic trip. The week before the "like Girls", a bunch of young teenage boys, surfers, got on. They had apparently been surfing all day and were taking the train home. The thing that amazed me about them is that for an entire hour, not a single intelligent thought was expressed from any of them. Granted, I didn't understand much of the surfing terminology being used, but everything besides surf was just about themselves. The girls were amusing. These boys were painful.

The one thing I did notice was their vocabulary for discussing surfing. There's an urban legend about Eskimos having hundreds of words to describe snow. I truly believe these boys had hundreds of words to describe a wave. It was awe inspiring at a certain level. They talked for a long time where I could understand the words, and infer some meaning, but not really know what the heck they were talking about. Other than it had something to do with surfing.

RE: Literally Wrong

SamBones, I see I am not the only one who gets the kicks out of ‘like’ 25 times in every sentence. Well, let’s call it ‘kicks’, but most of the time it drives me up the wall. And on the top of it – English is not my first (native) language. I cannot imagine how English teachers may feel about it, or maybe they don’t care any more…

I always wanted to approach such ‘like girls’ and ask them to skip all ‘likes’ and continue their conversation. That would be good for some giggles.

I wish I would have a little bell, like the ones in hotels on their front desks, that would make ‘ding’ sound every time ‘like’ is used. Combine that with Pavlov’s research and we have something…. smile

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: Literally Wrong

Thanks Santa. Now, every time I hear someone use the word "literally", I can't help but to mentally substitute my favorite profanity. It is pretty literally amusing, but I fear that some people may think I'm losing my literally mind when I start laughing for no apparent reason.

RE: Literally Wrong

@Sam,
>> There's an urban legend about Eskimos having hundreds of words to describe snow.
Actually, I do not believe they even have a word for snow... I think they just circumscribe the phenomenon, e.g. the white stuff that falls from the sky that is cold on nose... ;)

@Andre,
>> two people (guys) were talking using ONLY swear words, profanities, in their conversation, no other words were spoken.
you could've at least said "hello" to my friend and me... ;)

>> For some reason used A LOT by high school girls,
actually, that is called Valleyspeak, which I even remember from middle-school (grades 6 through 8 where I grew up) way back in the late 70's - early 80's... and it's like totally gnarly, just totally like tubular, ya know... ;) (NOT)

@Santa,

well, that was quite amusing, and you do have a point there...

Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

RE: Literally Wrong

(OP)
Santa's point is well made. However, the syntax may invalidate the substitution theory.

For example, Gholden's "he had to cut back inside on to his left, because he literally hasn't got a right foot" doesn't quite work for me and in reverse, ponoodle's "...I'm losing my literally mind..." also slightly misses the mark.

Nevertheless, a highly amusing exercise.

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally Wrong

I disagree to a point that the "like" phenomena is ValleySpeak. It may have evolved from that, maybe having it's roots there, but it is different. I was born and raised in the San Fernando Valley, which is where ValSpeak originated. The Frank Zappa song "Valley Girl" mentions a lot of places that I hung out at. I remember hearing it all over, long before the song and some movies made it a phenomena.

To me the "like" seems to be more akin to someone saying "uh" when they speak. It's a pause word while they think ahead on what they're saying. Something to fill the dead air. Well, that's not completely true, but I've noticed that if you were to take the full sentence that they said, and just deleted all of the "like"s, they are mostly complete thoughts and grammatically correct. Not always, but many times it is.

ValSpeak on the other hand seems to me to be a complete bastardization of the language. It is it's own dialect.

While listening to the "like girls", I had the thought that if my ears had a "like" filter that I could switch on, their conversation would actually be an intelligent and cogent discussion of school, their classes and teachers, and events in their friend's lives. But WITH the "like"s, they sounded like complete idiots.

Also, the bell idea is a great one and does work. I used to be in Toastmasters to learn how to better speak in front of people. One of the tools used is that someone will literally sit there listening to your speech with a bell in hand. Any time you say "uh", or "um", or any other placeholder noise or word, they ring the bell. The number of ringings is tallied and counts against your score for the speech. It's an extremely effective tool and teaches you very quickly that a small pause makes you sound much more intelligent than continually tossing in "uh", "um", "duh", or other noises.


RE: Literally Wrong

Did you drool and slobber a lot with every sound of the bell? smile

I have a co-worker who ends almost every sentence with “so…”

Have fun.

---- Andy

RE: Literally Wrong

I knew someone who ended most sentences with "right there", and with a thick southern accent. His friends sometimes would place bets on how many times he would say "right there" in a given time frame.

Jim

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote (Andrzejek)

Did you drool and slobber a lot with every sound of the bell?

It was hard to tell since I drool and slobber a lot anyway! bigsmile


RE: Literally Wrong

Sam,

I know what you are saying, I still think that "like", though, doesn't totally replace the "uh" (or thought pause), but rather to emphasize the point of the conversation.

e.g. "I really like hate that". Wouldn't make any sense, or wouldn't sound right, with either a thought pause or with "uh" in it... "like" stresses the word "hate" in that sentence...
the other example you wrote, "from like California", also does not meet the "uh" (or thought pause) symptom, rather it too stresses the following word "California"...

Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

RE: Literally Wrong

Maybe we need to start a new thread on "Valley-Speak/Surfer-Dude-Speak." My pet "Valley-Speak/Surfer-Dude-Speak" peeve is totally.

Quote (Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along)

We totally had sex.

I totally seen it used in like print lately, too.

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote:

We totally had sex.

Spoiler:

Would that be "no holes barred" sex?


RE: Literally Wrong

David Cross has a comedy routine on this subject:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ly1UTgiBXM

Warning: There are a few swear words in it.

Thanks,
Andrew

smarty Hard work often pays off over time, but procrastination pays off right now!

RE: Literally Wrong

Late to this party, but another filler phrase I've heard in these hyar parts is "...and everything else," as in

Quote:

So we were talking about going to the game and everything else,....

Really? Everything? It must have been a long conversation.

-----------
With business clients like mine, you'd be better off herding cats.

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote (Philhege)

"...and everything else,"

...which I dislike nearly as much as the ubiquitous, "...and stuff"...

Quote (My Grandson)

I'm going over to my friend's house and we're gonna watch TV and stuff and then get some pizza and stuff and then go play basketball and stuff.

I believe that the "...and stuff..." is what usually ends up justifying a call to 911/police.

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally Wrong

thread revival!!!

Ok, after reading this thread and not seeing it I had to add:

When someone makes a phrasing error like(such as) 'irregardless,' for some reason, it hits my ear like(with similarity to) a brick to the face.
But the worst of them all imo is 'same difference.'

I most often hear this phrase when person A suggests something trivial like visiting McDontald's and person B has a slightly differing suggestion 'like' Burger Queen. During the conversation that arises about to determine which suggestion is best someone will innevitably throw out 'same difference.'

For those not aware, the phrase 'same difference' requires at a minimum, 3 objects being compared to one another.

Literal Ex:
1 is less than 4 by 3, 2 is less than 5 by 3, therefor the differences between 1&4 and 5&3 are the same... 3. same differences.

*Also imo, it should always be in plural form if used correctly, ie. "same differences"

RE: Literally Wrong

Yeah, that one used to really irritate me, but it's in such common usage here (Oz) that I hear myself saying it sometimes!

I think it's a confusion between "no difference" and "same thing"... which to my mind turns it into a contradiction.

Even more mind-boggling is the common prefix to responses, for example when sports players are interviewed on TV, "Yeah nah, ...".

Annihilannic
tgmlify - code syntax highlighting for your tek-tips posts

RE: Literally Wrong

I always thought it was just to be funny. "Same" meaning equal, "Difference" meaning not equal. Saying it to be self contradictory just to be cute.


RE: Literally Wrong

(OP)
I have always thought it was a sort of sarcastic response. A bit like the "Whatever" the young 'uns use now.

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote:

3 objects being compared to one another.
no it does not...

Quote:

therefor the differences between 1&4 and 5&3 are the same
this is inheritable wrong, what it states is that there are actually only TWO objects being compared and that there is more than ONE difference between the two...
to clarify: 1&4 is one object and 5&3 is the other... the difference of 3 is singular, in this case...

thus the phrase, "same difference" is correct, and not the plural...


Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote:

. . . the differences between 1&4 and 5&3 are the same . . .
I'm sorry. I'm not up to date with the new math but isn't 1 - 4 = -3 (absolute value = 3) and 5 - 3 = 2? How are they the "same difference?"

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Literally Wrong

I told you I didn't understand the new match. winky smile

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Literally Wrong

Make "match" "math". colorface

James P. Cottingham
I'm number 1,229!
I'm number 1,229!

RE: Literally Wrong

Quote (r3db3ard)

the differences between 1&4 and 5&3 are the same... 3.
I hope that everyone recognizes that r3db3ard meant "5&3" to be "5&2".

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: Literally Wrong

Most of all, I hope that r3db3ard realises that. smile

Annihilannic
tgmlify - code syntax highlighting for your tek-tips posts

RE: Literally Wrong

<grin>

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

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