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"Upon" or Up on?"

"Upon" or Up on?"

"Upon" or Up on?"

(OP)
I was told one by someone much better with the English language than me, that "upon" is not a word and that it is in fact two words, "up on."

Is this true or was I really lead up the proverbial path or really that "upon" is just a very old word, that needs renewal?

I personally don't like the word "upon" anyway.

Where did "Once upon a time" come from, since you are not mounting time?

ACSS - SME
General Geek



RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

A simple search threw up a very simple answer, it is a valid word.

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/brit...
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/upon

According to the latter link it's been in use since the 12th century, so your learned friend is very clearly mistaken.

Robert Wilensky:
We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true.

http://alvechurchlounge.org.uk

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

James Taylor sang "Up on the roof" but Disney has an equally valid song "When you wish upon a Star"

Aspiring to mediocrity since 1957

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

Upon is a word, but it's also likely that it is the combination of up and on.

==> Where did "Once upon a time" come from, since you are not mounting time?
That phrase is English in origin; however, it's very old. It can be traced back at at least to the 1300s and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, but it's probably older than that. Originally, it was common to use 'upon' in reference to a time-related event, such as 'upon a day', meaning when that day comes. When that phrase is preceded by the term "once", it implies that the time related event took place at some time in the past. Again, the phrase, and thus the word 'upon', has been part of the English language for at least some 700 years, give or take.

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RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

Then there's Hereupon, Thereupon and Whereupon

Coupon doesn't count!!

Sam

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

"Once upon a time" is rendered in French as "Il y'a un fois" ("There was a time...") lending some credence to CC's exposition.

Frank Clarke
--America's source for adverse opinions since 1943.

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

  • "Upon" - When used correctly, one can typically substitue the word "on" without changing the meaning of a sentence.
    • The bird landed upon her shoulder.
    • The boat floated upon the water.
  • "Up on" - Used to emphasize relative physical elevation or altitude. Examples:
    • Santa's sleigh is up on the rooftop.
    • The book is up on the top shelf.

santaMufasa
(aka Dave of Sandy, Utah, USA)
“People may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel."

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

>Il y'a un[b]e[b] fois

=> Il était une fois

but I'm not sure how this has anything to do with 'upon'

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

Quote (strongm)

but I'm not sure how this has anything to do with 'upon'

Maybe not directly but the whole phrase translating to a construct of "Once there was a time" is a direct correlation to how "Once upon" is the same construct in English.

[Once] 'upon a time' DOES equate to [Once] 'there was a time' [aside Great G'n'R track, with or without the suggested message], and after all, the English language does contain many words and phrases that are mis-pronounced or a rough, sometimes literal translations from the languages of the many invaders of this sceptered Isle.

Chris.

Indifference will be the downfall of mankind, but who cares?
Time flies like an arrow, however, fruit flies like a banana.
Webmaster Forum

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

>the whole phrase translating to a construct of "Once there was a time"

But it doesn't. Colloquially it translates to "Once upon a time", but more literally translates to either "Once there was", "There was a time" (as you more correctly originally stated) or "there was once" - you can't translate "une fois" as "Once" and "a time" at the same time, and thus has little to do with the use of 'upon' in English ...

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

My pet peeve is the non word, "alright." I was taught in school that it is NOT a word and that it should be "all right." "Alright" seems to have been accepted in society and even new dictionaries, but I still protest that it is NOT a real word.

Jim

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

Consider the phrases: “The figures are all right” and “The figures are alright”. Discuss

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

(OP)
Regardless, I still don't like "upon." smile

ACSS - SME
General Geek



RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

==> Regardless, I still don't like "upon."
As long as you don't like it irregardless.

--------------
Good Luck
To get the most from your Tek-Tips experience, please read
FAQ181-2886: How can I maximize my chances of getting an answer?
Wise men speak because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something. - Plato

RE: "Upon" or Up on?"

(OP)
DOH! smile

ACSS - SME
General Geek



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