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The word detective

The word detective

The word detective

(OP)
In a recent post, I referred to this site:
http://www.word-detective.com/

For those of you who did not follow the link, you might like to try it.  The site's sub-title is, "words and language in a humourous vein on the web since 1995".

The content is similar to Uncle Cecil, but is aimed specifically at words and phrases - their origins, quirks and oddities.  My guess is that many of you will enjoy having a browse here.

It has been mentioned before on MAI, but the last time seems to have been back in '06, so perhaps a reminder is in order for newer members.

I hope you enjoy it.

Tony
 

RE: The word detective

The introduction alone is a very good read... thanks.

Annihilannic
tgmlify - code syntax highlighting for your tek-tips posts

RE: The word detective

OK, I give up. Where on that site is a discussion of "Grunts"?
 

RE: The word detective

Quote:

If our words, metaphors and idioms sometimes make no sense to a logical mind, or if it seems as though there ought to be a happy "gruntled" to accompany the cranky "disgruntled," we have only ourselves to blame. (There actually used to be a "gruntled," but it meant "grunting like a pig" or "cranky," and it faded away as "disgruntled," which simply added the intensifier "dis" and meant exactly the same thing, became popular.)
Source: Annihilannic link to About TWD...
PS: Online Etymology Dictionary, confirms it's use at around 1969 (in print), but it probably stems more from "grunting" (German cognate is "grunzen"), see the verb grunt as well...

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=grunt

Ben
"If it works don't fix it! If it doesn't use a sledgehammer..."
How to ask a question, when posting them to a professional forum.
Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no"

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