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Don't need help, just info.

Don't need help, just info.

Don't need help, just info.

(OP)
1) Please forgive my ignorance
2) Please don't die laughing (I'd hate to have that on my conscious)
3) Answer politely if you can.
4) I understand most network/computer things, I am not a programmer, network admin, web designer or other, (well not anymore) I however still get curious.  

Here is the story, I bought a cheap $29 Netgear wireless router for my apt so my work computer and laptop can share the broadband.  Since it is wireless I have given acccess (encrypted) to a 2 friends that live in close apartments, (they don't use it much).  So still being curious, I got a program called Look @ Lan, very basic but cool and it lets me know when or more like if they actually get on the network.  So here is the weird thing.  By default it checks   192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.255, which is actually more addresses than I even have enabled.  However, today, and just for gigglesl, I asked it to check 192.168.1.44 to 192.168.5.1.  So it runs its check and boom like 20 ip addresses (somewhat randome) are there, all above those that I have told the router to assign, some go on and off about every 5 minutes some stay on,  I have "scanned" the online addresses and found that they all have  Port 21 (FTP) and Telenet, forgot the port, active.  I suspect this is the router's "overhead" , packet testing, forwarding, preventing collisons etc, etc" that voodoo that it do.  However, I am just curious if someone has a bit more accurate or interesting (hopefully accurate) explanation?  I appreciate the time you spent reading the email and the time you spent responding to it.  Thanks.  T3surfer.

RE: Don't need help, just info.

Sounds like you're running a port scanner, which is finding stuff that's connected to your router.

Does your Netgear have a status page where you can see the clients that are connected to it?  Sounds like time to change your wireless security, at the very least.  Change the SSID and turn off SSID broadcast; you can hook up your friends with the network name manually and get them hooked in with WPA.

RE: Don't need help, just info.

Also enable MAC Filter, you will have to define each MAC address on your router so they can connect.... This is what I do...

I dont bother with encryption toooo much overhead...


Also as the guy above suggests turn of SSID broadcast....

RE: Don't need help, just info.

boxall, only problem with that is a wireless sniffer can read your MAC addresses easily and spoof the heck out of them. It's more trivial than, for example, hacking WPA.

It will, of course, foil the casual freeloader.

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