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__Tips from GHTROUT

Isn't There Something Like BARS 101? by GHTROUT
Posted: 12 Mar 06 (Edited 15 Jan 11)

The Origonal BARS101 was published by GHTROUT in 2001,  and can be found in basic HTML format at http://www.ghtrout.com/

Yes!  
Basic Automatic Route Selection.  If you dial "9", you are accessing BARS.  "9" is the "BARS Access Code"

1. A telephone dials "9" - BARS activates.
2. The telephone dials a number - Example: 1312-XXX-XXXX
3. The PBX holds the digits while it looks up "1312" to figure out what Route List to use for processing the call.
4. The Route List determines the possible trunk routes that can be used.
5. The Route List checks the facility restriction level of the telephone and compares it to its own required facility restriction level.
6. The Route List checks to see if any special digit manipulation should be performed.

LD90 NET

The LD90 Network overlay is where area codes and exchanges are defined.  If a prefix is not entered into LD90, it cannot be dialed through BARS.   Each area code or exchange refers to a "Route List" or RLI which contains the instructions for routing the call.

CODE

>ld 90
ESN000
REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT net
TRAN ac1
TYPE npa
NPA 1312
NPA 1312 <-- This is the network number (prefix)
RLI 11  <-- This is the Route List that the prefix gets instruction from
DENY 976 <-- This is an exchange in NPA 312 that is blocked.  Optional, but common
SDRR DENY CODES = 1
DMI 0
ITEI NONE
REQ end

LD86 RLB (or RLI)

The RLB is a "list" of possible trunk routes that an area code or exchange (NPA, NXX, SPN) can be selected for the call.  Each "ENTR" or list entry contains a trunk route.  Each entry also has a "minimum Facility Restriction Level" or "FRL" that must be met or exceeded before a phone can access that entry.

In the following example, the first ENTR can be accessed by phones whose NCOS equals an FRL of 3 or above.  The second entry can only be accessed by phones whose NCOS equals an FRL of 6 or above.  For example, less important phones might be NCOS 3 and very important phones might be NCOS 6.  If all trunks in the first route choice were busy, only important phones would have access to the trunks in the second route choice.

Along with the trunk route and the FRL, you can apply specific "digit manipulation" with the DMI entry.   The DMI entries are explained here.

CODE

>ld 86
ESN000
REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT rlb
RLI 11

RLI 11

ENTR 0 <-- This is the list's first "Entry Number"
LTER NO
ROUT 15 <-- This is the first choice Trunk Route Number
TOD 0 ON 1 ON 2 ON 3 ON
    4 ON 5 ON 6 ON 7 ON
CNV NO
EXP NO
FRL 3 <-- This is the Facility Restriction Level
DMI 10 <-- This is the Digit Manipulation Index Number
FCI 0
FSNI 0
OHQ YES
CBQ YES

ENTR 1 <-- This is the list's second "Entry Number"
LTER NO
ROUT 9 <-- This is the second choice Trunk Route Number
TOD 0 ON 1 ON 2 ON 3 ON
    4 ON 5 ON 6 ON 7 ON
CNV NO
EXP YES <-- This is considered the "expensive" choice
FRL 6 <-- Note that the Facility Restriction Level is higher
DMI 0 <-- Note no digit manipulation is required for this trunk route
FCI 0
FSNI 0
OHQ YES
CBQ YES
ISET 2
MFRL 3

REQ end


LD87 NCTL

The FRL to NCOS "relationship" is built in the NCTL data block.  The FRL and the NCOS do not necessarily have the equal one another, however they usually do.  A higher FRL/NCOS has more capability than a lower FRL/NCOS.  For an NCOS number to have any capability, it must first be defined in the NCTL data block.

CODE

>ld 87
ESN000
REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT nctl
NRNG 0 7 <-- Range from NCOS 0 through 7 was requested
SOHQ NO
SCBQ YES
CBTL 10
---------------
NCOS 0
EQA NO
FRL 0
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ NO
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 1
EQA NO
FRL 1
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT I
RADT 0
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 2
EQA NO
FRL 0
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ NO
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 3
EQA NO
FRL 3 <-- NCOS 3 equals FRL 3.
RWTA YES
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT I
RADT 10
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 4
EQA NO
FRL 4
RWTA YES
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT A
RADT 10
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 5
EQA NO
FRL 5
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT A
RADT 10
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 6
EQA NO
FRL 6 <-- NCOS 6 equals FRL 6.
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT A
RADT 0
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
---------------
NCOS 7
EQA NO
FRL 7
RWTA NO
NSC NO
OHQ NO
CBQ YES
RETT 10
RETC 5
ROUT A
RADT 0
SPRI 0
MPRI 0
PROM 0
TOHQ NONE

LD86 Digit Manipulation

The Digit Manipulation data blocks are where special prefixes are entered before numbers are sent out over trunks.  An example of digit manipulation is where a 1010XXX carrier access code must be inserted before a number is processed over a trunk.

CODE

REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT dgt
DMI 10
DMI 10 <-- This is simply the index number.
DEL 1 <-- This says "delete the first digit after "9"
CTYP NCHG



REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT dgt
DMI 3
DMI 3
DEL 0 <-- This says "delete nothing after 9"
INST 1010288 <-- This says "Insert 1010288 after 9 and before the actual number dialed". 1010288 is a way to select ATT for a call.
CTYP NCHG
REQ end

Telephone

This is simply a telephone's data block

CODE

DES 5135
TN 004 0 14 00
TYPE 500
CDEN 4D
CUST 0
DN 5135 MARP
     CPND
     NAME Typical User
     XPLN 9
     DISPLAY_FMT FIRST,LAST
AST NO
IAPG 0
HUNT
TGAR 1
LDN NO
NCOS 5  <-- What FRL does this equal?
SGRP 0
RNPG 0
LNRS 16
XLST
SCI 0
CLS CTD DTN FBD XFA WTA THFD FND HTD ONS
    LPR XRA CWD SWD MWA LPD XHD CCSD LNA TVD
    CFTD SFD C6D PDN CNID CLBD AUTU
    ICDD CDMD EHTD MCTD
    GPUD DPUD CFXD ARHD OVDD AGTD CLTD LDTA ASCD
    MBXD CPFA CPTA DDGA NAMA
    SHL ABDD CFHD
    USRD BNRD OCBD
RCO 0
PLEV 02
FTR CFW 4
DATE 28 NOV 1978

LD86 ESN - the Start of BARS

The ESN data block is the root of BARS.   Before BARS can be set up, the ESN data block must be defined.

CODE

>ld 86
ESN000
REQ prt
CUST 0
FEAT esn
MXLC 0
MXSD 30
MXIX 0
MXDM 100
MXRL 80
MXFC 60
MXFS 0
MXSC 120
NCDP 4
AC1 9 <-- This is where "9" is defined
AC2
DLTN YES
ERWT YES
ERDT 0
TODS 0 00 00 23 59  <-- This section refers only to time of day routing controls
RTCL DIS
NCOS 0 - 0  <-- This section refers only to time of day routing controls
NCOS 1 - 1
NCOS 2 - 2
NCOS 3 - 3
NCOS 4 - 4
NCOS 5 - 5
NCOS 6 - 6
NCOS 7 - 7
<continued to 99...>
NCOS 99 - 99
ETOD
TGAR NO
REQ end


The Origonal BARS101 was first published by GHTROUT in 2001 - http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.ghtrout.com

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