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What does "PROC(10)" mean?

What does "PROC(10)" mean?

(OP)
I am working at a shop that is split between COBOL and DIBOL, and I have noticed several programs in DIBOL that use PROC(10) instead of just PROC.  Nobody seems to know what it means.  Anyone know what this is?  I've never used this, and I cannot track down anything in documentation that gives a clue.  Is this an obsolete feature?

BTW - VAX DIBOL V4.2 - VAX/VMS V5.5-2H4

RE: What does "PROC(10)" mean?

Have you considered upgrading to OpenVMS on an ALPHA
using Synergy/DBL?
Synergy/DBL also runs on other platforms...

This is out of the VAX DIBOL reference manual:

PROC {(nliteral)}
              statement
        .
        .
        .
  {END}


  Parameters
  nliteral
  A numeric literal that specifies the size of the I/O buffer
  allocated to every opened Sequential file.


  statement
  A DIBOL Procedure Division statement.
  Rules
  .
        Only 1 PROC may be used in a program.
  .
        .PROC cannot be used in the same program as PROC.
  .
        PROC cannot have a statement label.
  .
        Nliteral is ignored in external subroutines.
  .
        Nliteral must be between 1 and 127 blocks (1 block = 512
        bytes).
  .
        If no nliteral is specified, it is assumed to be 1.
  .
        Nliteral is meaningful only with Sequential files. For
        Relative and Indexed files, the buffer sizes are determined
        by the bucket size specified when defining the file.
  .
        The BUFSIZ used in an OPEN statement overrides the
        buffer size established by PROC just for that OPEN.
  .
        END is not mandatory.
  .
        Termination of the PROC-END block, either explicitly
        (END) or implicitly (end-of-file) causes an implicit STOP
        statement to be inserted into the compiled program.
  .
        END can be used anywhere in a program except as the
        statement to be executed in an IF, IF-THEN-ELSE,
        FOR, WHILE, DO-UNTIL, or USING statement.
  .
        Source lines following END are not compiled.
  Run-Time Error Conditions


  .
        $ERR_BADCMP F Compiler not compatible with execu-
        tion system
  .
        $ERR_NOTDIB F Caller not DIBOL
  .
        $ERR_SYSTEM E System error


  Examples
  1. RECORD REC
                      , A100
        LITERAL
                      EOF, I1, 0
        PROC (3)
                      OPEN (1,I,'INFILE.DDF') ; Open input file
                      OPEN (2,O,'OUTFIL.DDF') ; Open output file
                      DO
                              BEGIN
                              READS (1,REC,EOF) ; Read input record
                              WRITES (2,REC) ; Write output record
                              END
                      UNTIL EOF
        EOF,
                      CLOSE 1 ; Close input file
                      CLOSE 2 ; Close output file
                      STOP
        END
        This example copies 100 character records from
        INFILE.DDF to OUTFIL.DDF. The PROC statement
        specifies that a 3 block buffer is to be allocated for each
        opened channel. After the 2 OPEN statements are ex-
        ecuted, 6 blocks will have been allocated for internal
        buffers.

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