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wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
24 Jan 03 12:57
I am looking for photos on the web that can accompany instructional text i have written concerning the termination of wiring on 66 blocks.  This is for people who have never done this before so I need REAL BASIC stuff and illustrations.
Does anyone have any links and/or existing photos that can be sent to me to assist in this project?
jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
24 Jan 03 15:26
Dont know of any links off hand (im not at home) but maybe you could go through the steps and have someone take photos of it. It is easier to explain (I think) if you can show the way you do something.

jeff moss
jeffmoss26@adelphia.net

SYQUEST (TechnicalUser)
21 Feb 03 3:36
I have some old Bell System practices on the 66 series connecting blocks, but in paper format only. I don't have a scanner. Are there any old timers that might be able to upload something like the BSPs or other similar training material to the net? One other suggestion is in the back of the Siemon Company catalogue (www.siemon.com) they have an installation practices section that covers some basics on 66 and 110 products. Check that out and see if it is useful to you.

Hope this helps!

JIM
mikeydidit (IS/IT--Management)
21 Feb 03 8:58
I have a couple of things you may like. Send me you e-mail address and i'll send them to you.
wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
21 Feb 03 10:03
My email address is <william.downs@IGT.com>.
Please send me what you have.  I found a few tid bits but nothing that has hit the mark yet.
THANKS!
OMBD (Vendor)
21 Feb 03 21:37
Check some older installation manuals on key systems. Many of the Appendix sections of the manuals discuss proper termination practices with pictures of 66B and 66M split blocks.
I can check my shelf for older manuals but it seems the older Toshiba key systems and Cortelco 501 systems had these included. If I come across any I will email them to the above email address.

Jerry Pannell
www.SCLB.com
techs@sclb.com

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
24 Feb 03 11:42
I eventually had to take pictures to illustrate what I needed, but I did find and modified a couple of things to assist me.
If you know anyone who needs a copy of these or want to save them for future use, email me at <william.downs@IGT.com> and I will send them to you.
THANKS!
stevethom (IS/IT--Management)
1 Mar 03 14:50
Just do a google search for "66 block wiring diagram". There are dozens of good links.

'Then I thought - it is easier to get out of the way when we are in it, than to get in when we are out'... John Bunyon, "Pilgrims Progress"

Helpful Member!(2)  curlycord (Programmer)
30 Mar 03 3:06
I have this question.....why do Americans still use 66?
66 has been out dated in Canada for 17 or more years now, there must be some reason?
I know that there is the 110 newer than 66 which compared to BIX still blows but what gives with this use of 66 still as it has been bugging me for some time now, just like the star headed (Philips) screw driver is still used over the square headed (Roberton), is it because Canada invented BIX and Roberton? or lack of introduction?.

TouchToneTommy (Vendor)
30 Mar 03 18:49
Because you can take a butt set and clip onto the terminals of a 66 block for testing. You don't need special adapters or need to use the bed-of-nails clip on the jumper wire.

Because of the huge imbedded base, you wouldn't throw up a 110 or bix when adding more cable runs to an exsisting cable plant.

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
31 Mar 03 9:56
I have used BIX, 66, and 110 blocks in the past.

66 blocks are used mostly in existing plant where most buildings have left in cable and blocks.

I like 110 blocks but if not used properly they can be trouble.

I like 110 better then BIX because it seems more ergonomical but other then that the BIX blocks are fine.
SYQUEST (TechnicalUser)
31 Mar 03 14:58
Hi curlycord,
I have been wondering that myself... A couple of reasons why: It seems no one wants to "plan" installations anymore judging from the state of most phone rooms I see these days and just add the same old stuff. When they run out of wall space good luck! Another one is, since the inside wire was deregulated in this country, no one wants to pay for anything(money) or take the time to change a setup. I have been using BIX since 1980!! Of all the Cross-connect systems to date I think it is still the BEST!! All of these cross-connect systems have installation practices, so if you want a good understanding of them, then people need to READ them or see the video(there is a BIX video outthere somewhere, I have seen it) and of course hands-on is the best by someone that knows the product. Each has its good and bad points. There are test clips available for both BIX and 88/110 connectors and BIX even has a 25-pair test shoe. 66 blocks waste too much valuable wall space amoung other things. A properly planned backboard or frame with BIX or 110 can triple pair capacity over 66 blocks. But old habits die hard, the old dog can learn new tricks though! You can find info on BIX at www.NORDX.com.

.....JIM......
mikeydidit (IS/IT--Management)
31 Mar 03 16:05
Ok guy's. Now you got me started. I still use and design our "telecomm" closets using 66 blocks. Just for the voice. I am running around 5200 stations here today and have not had a problem with 66 blocks the last 15 years, other that how it was punched. About 10 years ago we did a cut over to a newer phone switch and had the option to use 110. After a discussion with a friend of mine at another hospital we chose to use 66 blocks. On the telephone side of the house, every phone I have will move at least once. 110 blades wear out and you have to replace them. I have 66 blocks that have been longer than me and still work great everytime for t-1,ISDN,digital and analog services.

Just my 2 cents guy's.

If you find any mistakes, please consider that they are there for a purpose. And everyone needs a purpose.
Hope this helps, Mikey.

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
31 Mar 03 16:19
I can see the logic in both view points.
66 blocks are cheap, reliable, and they are EVERYWHERE!
110 is not idiot proof, nor is it idiot resistant!  66 blocks are ALMOST idiot resistant even though I have seen people that can break them too.
110 blocks do take up a lot less room, and if you are the only one using them, or you are confident in your crew then it would be the way to go for sure.
BIX blocks, even though I have used them, would be my second choice.  After all, 110 inserts are not hard to put in if you have the right tool for it.
Vendors do tend to be cheap when it comes to rehabing a phone room, but then again, how many old Bell System terminals do you still see out there????????

MY 2 cents.................
curlycord (Programmer)
31 Mar 03 20:49
BIX takes up less way less room then 66 and little less then 110
BIX can be terminate much faster then 66 and little faster then 110
BIX is much neater then 66 or 110
BIX is not that expensive
BIX tool does not get dull or wear out
BIX cross connecting is much faster then 66 or 110.
QUOTE:
"Because you can take a butt set and clip onto the terminals of a 66 block for testing. You don't need special adapters or need to use the bed-of-nails clip on the jumper wire."
Your kidding me right? an adaptor that takes all of 3 seconds to put on your Test set? and it stays on most of the time too lol.
You can go accross the BIX field for testing about 3-4 times faster then a 66 for heavens sake.

We put any new cables in an old warehouse/building on BIX even if there is existing 66, why? because if you going to do the job then do it right and that includes using UP TO DATE equipment, there are far too many messy phone rooms out there because of lazy techs refusing to add updated equipment.

These are my opinions and I have worked with all 3 of them over 20 years and this is why I pose this question....no wonder it takes so long for some of you to do an install, get on your boss's ass and get the good stuff.

SYQUEST (TechnicalUser)
2 Apr 03 1:25
Curlycord, you hit the nail on the head!! I couldn't have said it better!
 I am tired of the crumbling plastic of 66 blocks or stuck pieces of insulation causing intermittent connections, etc, etc... 66 can't hold a candle to BIX at anytime. It was good in 1962 for the first IDC, but BIX is such a vast improvement and is sooo flexible in designing a cross-connect. It is the BEST in my book. It is also reusable, which the 110 is NOT! Have you ever tried to remove a 110 connector. You replace it, if you do. You don't reuse it. Even in the Bell System Practices, it says don't reuse, replace it! WECO made a wire retaining toolto hold the leads in the 110 index strip when removing the connector, but I have never seen one except in the BSPs and the installation practice for the Avaya Legend. Without it the leads all fall out. The BIX connector is completely reusable, either with 2-pair or 25-pair or jumper wire. They also make different BIX 'modular' connectors for 2, 3, or 4 pair jacks. Once you understand the BIX concept I don't think you would want to go back. I don't!

.....JIM.....
Bobg1 (TechnicalUser)
2 Apr 03 7:46
Everyone will have thier own opinion on what they prefer.
Heck you can probably find a few who still like using wire wrap.
jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
2 Apr 03 9:45
I am meeting with a Nordx rep on Friday, maybe he can send me a BIX block to try out. All this sounds really interesting. I use 66 blocks almost all the time, the one 110 block I used is now smashed to pieces.

jeff moss

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
2 Apr 03 10:03
Even though I don't prefer 66 blocks, they will not go away any time soon.
They are CHEAP, a big factor with most vendors, reusable, and because there are so many I don't think we will ever see the end of them.
One big advantage is you can get them in 25x4, 50x2, 25x6 and 50x3 configurations, which gives it a big advantage when it comes to line sharing.  That way you can run seperate jumpers to each shared point without having 1 cross connect looped through several different places.
I know line sharing is not popular amung vendors but in the real world it does exist.
Anyway, we deal with lots of old phone closets so the fact remains that you still have to train your people in the use of them.
curlycord (Programmer)
3 Apr 03 23:27
Good points SYQUEST!

BIX also has line share connectors...they are Part number QCBIX7A and more also.

Ok one more:

Cheap companies that supply their techs with aluminium ladders have no fear because you can lean them up against BIX and not short anything out.
:P lol

Here is some parts but not all:
http://www.i2automation.com/nordx.htm

AvayaNovice (Vendor)
6 Apr 03 18:52
Here are a few reasons to be PRO-66.

REASON 1

With 66 blocks, you can wet your index finger on each hand, touch your probe up to your finger on one hand, and run your other finger down a block and fine tone.

BIX blocks (I've never used one, but from what I've seen and read) are just like 110 -- hidden in plastic, you can't even touch the contacts.  That would take a bit longer to find tone, secondly -- you can't short a pair as easily with BIX, shorting a pair with 66 to check to make sure that the tone you detect is the correct one is as easy as placing your probe's tip across the pair.

REASON 2

66 blocks are EVERYWHERE.  Sure, we could start a trend and replace them with BIX blocks -- but they're never going away (66).  Why reinvent the wheel when the benefit is minimal?

REASON 3

I haven't seen that many 66 blocks fail, crumble, or whatever -- and if they are, maybe your wiring closet is a bit too exposed to the elements.

REASON 4

Replacing or putting in a new 66 block costs nearly nothing, they're cheap as all hell.  Bix blocks are not.  110 blocks aren't that bad, but they aren't anywhere near as quick as a 66 block.

REASON 5

A 66 punchdown blade is a whole lot less mechanical than a BIX blade.  And cheaper too...

Bottom line?  BIX is more expensive, doesn't have as many uses, and wouldn't be beneficial enough for me to justify replacing other blocks, or using them for installs.
curlycord (Programmer)
6 Apr 03 19:20
Reason 1?
You dont have to wet your finger to do that unless you have a cheap toner and probe set lol and you can also do that on the BIX by running your finger on the cut wires....works just as good.
You can short a pair easily with the flat blade of the probe at the same place.

Reason 2?
They are most certianly not everywhere up here and the trend was started long ago and as for benefits they most certianly are not minimal as clearly stated above. We have almost rid our country of that 66 cheap crap.

Reason 3?
Did somebody mention that 66 falls apart? I know that BIX and 110 also do not fall apart.

Reason 4?
Most of us put in quality and not cheap products and we wish those who use cheap products would get the hell out of this industry and go play with their meccano set instead and 66 faster then 110 or BIX? you have got to be kidding me LMAO!

Reason 5?
You never need to sharpen a BIX punch and they arent that bloody expensive...unless you have a habit of loosing them all the time. The BIX tool is well designed with no mainteniance required.

Bottom line?
You have not right to comment as you did if you have never used them before....reading is a far cry from on hands experience.

Ok I had my fun...cheers dude lol.

AvayaNovice (Vendor)
6 Apr 03 21:24
No need to get intense bro.

We're all just providing one another with insight...

You have to wet your finger to get a good connection between your body and the probe.

Secondly, the point of doing that is to get a connection directly to the contact, not through the sheathing on cut wires or whatever -- that's no good.

I don't know, I like it our way just fine.  I've used 110 for I don't know how long, and I think it's great for data (networking) because it's a lot more idiot proof... but 66 is great for phones.
mikeydidit (IS/IT--Management)
7 Apr 03 9:39
Bill started something with this . I think what this boils down to is what you are used to. Their are a lot of products and more coming out every day to replace or try to, 66 blocks. I dont believe that any of us will ever get completely away from 66 blocks unless you have the pleasure of just working in all new buildings. I also believe that all these other products have their place. In my case the whole infrastucture of our complex on the telephone side of the house was already set up with 66 blocks. I was also trained by some old bell/at&t guys so that explains that. One last thing also " if it works don't fix it." I am sure that the 110,bix,66 block people all agree with that on what they use.

If you find any mistakes, please consider that they are there for a purpose. And everyone needs a purpose.
Hope this helps, Mikey.

jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
7 Apr 03 22:30
I have helped with several phone and data installations (with my dad's company) in the past couple years.
Only once, for one connection (in a specific job)did we use a 110 block. Every other connection in that job and all other jobs I worked on used 66 blocks. I can count on one hand the number of 110 blocks they have in stock in their warehouse. I use 66 blocks all the time at home as well.

jeff moss

curlycord (Programmer)
7 Apr 03 23:49
Quote:
"Bill started something with this"
Yep lol
Quote:
"No need to get intense bro"
All though I was trying to be funny..maybe it was to intense, my apologies.

Quote:
"I use 66 blocks all the time at home as well"
How big is your home?

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
8 Apr 03 10:09
HEY GUYS
Really, I promise I wasn't trying to start ANYTHING, but it kind of took on a life of it's own.
If you read my original text you will see I was looking for illustrations only.  
As it has been noted here, 66s won't go away any time soon because there are still a lot of people that firmly believe in them, plus they are EVERYWHERE!
The reason I was looking for them is because they ARE everywhere and I need to teach people how to work on existing inside plant.
As far as I am concerned, we have kind of been beating on the same old horse for a while now.
Ain't it dead already????????
jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
8 Apr 03 17:28
I have a bunch of stuff set up in the basement of my house (my workshop) and I used 66 blocks for my phone connections, since I ran a bunch of phone cabling and jacks around the room.

jeff moss

AvayaNovice (Vendor)
8 Apr 03 18:09
Son... how old are you?
wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
8 Apr 03 18:13
What is this "son" stuff?
I , for the record, am 46 and one of the last of the true "Bell Shaped Heads."
I started with what was "Mountain Bell" in 1978.
66 blocks were a way of life then, and I spent my first 4 months out in the field doing nothing but punching down 66 blocks.
bhanson184 (TechnicalUser)
8 Apr 03 18:42
http://www.celticrover.com/tig/default.asp

Try this site if your still looking for information.

BH
AvayaNovice (Vendor)
8 Apr 03 22:28
wmdowns, the how old are you and "son" was in reference to jeffmoss26.
jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
9 Apr 03 7:54
I am in high school.

jeff moss

mikeydidit (IS/IT--Management)
9 Apr 03 9:20
I gave you a star even if you dont like 66 blocks.




If you find any mistakes, please consider that they are there for a purpose. And everyone needs a purpose.
Hope this helps, Mikey.

wmdowns (Instructor) (OP)
9 Apr 03 10:17
Curlycord, Thanks a lot.
That is exactly what I wanted.
I think I will give you a star as well......
jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
9 Apr 03 15:12
Those are nice sites. Is the Hubbell stuff from a new catalog?

jeff moss

curlycord (Programmer)
9 Apr 03 19:48
Catalog:
http://www.hubbell-premise.com/OnlineCatalog.htm

Thanks for the stars :)

Master Of Debates out....lol

jeffmoss26 (TechnicalUser)
9 Apr 03 21:00
Thanks, I checked it out earlier. I am looking for a 2003 print version of their catalog but couldn't find a request form on their site.

jeff moss

skip555 (TechnicalUser)
9 Apr 03 22:08
You have to wet your finger to get a good connection between your body and the probe.

  not in my part of the world where 85% hummidity is a dry day

Helpful Member!(2)  daronwilson (Vendor)
13 Apr 03 23:27
Wow, interesting discussion.  Can't resist stirring the pot a bit.

First...I think there have been plenty of reasons listed for using 66 blocks, but lets just highlight a couple.  They are less expensive, can be Cat5 compliant, are super for RJ21x type service where you want to bridge and unbridge easily, and they have a huge installed base. The ability to bring a bunch of lines in on one side and send them each out to 3 locations is super IF that is the type of installation you have.  Having done a lot of broadcast work, we use a belden solid single pair shielded wire, and many sources have up to 4 other places they are sent to.  66 blocks are most efficient for testing, and allow easy meter lead placement for testing.  Just becuase you feel BIX is superior to all others, doesn't mean it is practical for everyone to abandon their current system and go with yours.  Hell if we did that with every new telecom widget that came out, we'd be replacing wire and connectors and systems weekly.  

Second...Installing BIX on new installations is not at all the right answer if you have an existing cable plant of another type.  If your horizontal cabling is terminated on 110's for example, and you are installing a new PBX, it would be downright a pain in the butt to have to run jumpers with 110 on one end, and BIX on the other.  It is clearly of NO advantage to the customer or service guy.  I would not likely design or accept a design with that plan.

Oh before I forget, someone said something about using an aluminum ladder and leaning against the BIX blocks without shorting.  Wow.  If you are doing cabling/wiring/electrical with an aluminum ladder, you are freaking nuts anyway.  The sheer safety aspect alone should be clear to anyone in the industry.

SO the big question is "what is the best?"  Do you suppose there is a reason that many central offices wire wrap and/or solder?  Sure there is, it is quite likely the best (least resistive, least problematic) connection for the service.  So why don't we do that in the field?  Generally because it is easier (read=cheaper) to terminate wiring on IDC type connectors.  Of course all IDC connectors are not the same, but they are similar.  So when choosing the 'best' solution for your customer you should be weighing what is the most cost effective, technically solid solution.  In many many installations, simple cabling and jumpers in telco closets that are already layed out with 66 blocks, adding one 66 block is way smarter than throwing a BIX in the mix.

New installations where you are starting from scratch you should weigh what is important to your customer.  Does BIX offer lower connectivity resistance over 110 thereby making a noticable difference in connectivity?  I doubt it.  Is the BIX solution less expensive for the customer?  Likely not. Is the installation so tight for space that the change from 110 layout to BIX will allow you to do the install.  Hardly ever.

curleycord you made some interesting comments, and if you wish I can sure show you what a broken 110 AND BIX block look like, they aren't indestructable.  Also, my freaking BIX blade doesn't cut after hundreds of terminations, so..they do fail.  I do have a 110 adapter as well as a BIX adapter for my buttset, oddly enough the angled clips that come with almost any quality buttset fit right over the ole 66 block with no extra adapter.  I figured you sounded a bit arrogant for a cable guy, then re-read the posts and see you are a programmer.  

Personally I don't spec or buy or install BIX unless there is a reason.  Frankly, if they make a better (less resistance, less troublesome) connection than the 110, I've never seen it.  If the existing installation is BIX, I would quite likely add to it to be consistant even though BIX is more expensive for no apparent benefit.  But, we don't see them much anymore.  The last 10 Northern Telecom installs I've been on the Technicians won't even use them, they bring 110's for the install.  Go figure.

Good Luck!

It is only my opinion, based on my experience and education...I am always willing to learn, educate me!
Daron J. Wilson, RCDD
daron.wilson@lhmorris.com

curlycord (Programmer)
14 Apr 03 23:30
Quore:
" Hell if we did that with every new telecom widget that came out, we'd be replacing wire and connectors and systems weekly."

LMAO! yes they sure came out with a lot of widget's in the last 20 yrs eh? NOT!

Quote:
"Second...Installing BIX on new installations is not at all the right answer if you have an existing cable plant of another type.  If your horizontal cabling is terminated on 110's for example, and you are installing a new PBX, it would be downright a pain in the butt to have to run jumpers with 110 on one end, and BIX on the other.  It is clearly of NO advantage to the customer or service guy.  I would not likely design or accept a design with that plan."

Gee I cant imagine anyone doing that also....110 beside BIX? thats too funny! since they are both almost the same format ya know?.

Quote:
"Oh before I forget, someone said something about using an aluminum ladder and leaning against the BIX blocks without shorting.  Wow.  If you are doing cabling/wiring/electrical with an aluminum ladder, you are freaking nuts anyway.  The sheer safety aspect alone should be clear to anyone in the industry.
Like I said there are cheap vendors out there that supply thier techs with those ladders but even worse the cable pullers also....I agree on the safety factor bigtime!"

Quote:
"SO the big question is "what is the best?"  Do you suppose there is a reason that many central offices wire wrap and/or solder?  Sure there is, it is quite likely the best (least resistive, least problematic) connection for the service.  So why don't we do that in the field?  Generally because it is easier (read=cheaper) to terminate wiring on IDC type connectors.  Of course all IDC connectors are not the same, but they are similar.  So when choosing the 'best' solution for your customer you should be weighing what is the most cost effective, technically solid solution.  In many many installations, simple cabling and jumpers in telco closets that are already layed out with 66 blocks, adding one 66 block is way smarter than throwing a BIX in the mix."

We are big on doing away with 66 up here due to the many reasons listed already.

Quote:
"curleycord you made some interesting comments, and if you wish I can sure show you what a broken 110 AND BIX block look like, they aren't indestructable.  Also, my freaking BIX blade doesn't cut after hundreds of terminations, so..they do fail.  I do have a 110 adapter as well as a BIX adapter for my buttset, oddly enough the angled clips that come with almost any quality buttset fit right over the ole 66 block with no extra adapter.  I figured you sounded a bit arrogant for a cable guy, then re-read the posts and see you are a programmer."  

Well if you take a bloody hammer to them sure they will break...also there are plenty of blackmarket type BIX products out there that you can brake very easily with your hands. My condoences on your freakin BIX tool! I have had mine for about 12 years now and works better than a new one. As for the adapter for BIX I made my point about it allready....speedy adaptor vs struggling with clips lol.
Arrogant? hmmmm....well this is not your first cheap shot at me on these forums so consider me used to it now lol.
Yes Darrin I am a programmer....ever wonder how I got to where I am now? the wizard waved his wand and poof! here I am.

Quote:
"Personally I don't spec or buy or install BIX unless there is a reason.  Frankly, if they make a better (less resistance, less troublesome) connection than the 110, I've never seen it.  If the existing installation is BIX, I would quite likely add to it to be consistant even though BIX is more expensive for no apparent benefit.  But, we don't see them much anymore.  The last 10 Northern Telecom installs I've been on the Technicians won't even use them, they bring 110's for the install. Go figure."

I cant recall and problems with BIX in over 17 yrs and that goes for 66 and 110 but we all agreed on that.
BIX is more expensive for many reason listed above and saves you on labour BIGTIME!
As for the last 10 tech's using 110? I guess they are smart guys who agree with me then...
"66 SUCKS and smart cable pullers do it with yellow 77"

lol
:P

daronwilson (Vendor)
15 Apr 03 21:00
I was prepared to have a battle of wits....but I see you are unarmed.

Enjoy your Bix sire, I'm sure someday they will rule the telecom world.

It is only my opinion, based on my experience and education...I am always willing to learn, educate me!
Daron J. Wilson, RCDD
daron.wilson@lhmorris.com

curlycord (Programmer)
16 Apr 03 23:27
Arr (Vendor)
22 Apr 03 14:04
Hey all,

 Just a question on expense. In Canada BIX rails cost about $7.00 each and mounting frames about $12.00. How does this compare in the US and to 110?
 Anyone know where the distribution center for the product is?

PhM

acewarlock (TechnicalUser)
1 May 03 14:32
In my 30 years in telecom I still like the 66 block best, not because it is cheaper but I like to use a bridging clip between both sides instead of using both sides. this way I can open the circuit to look both ways on the cable to find the problem easier. I have used both the BIX and the 110 blocks and between the two I prefer the BIX.

Just my 2 cents
Arr (Vendor)
2 May 03 2:17
Ace,
 So... I really was curious about all the price claims ... both ways. Any comment re pricing comparison?

PhM

AvayaNovice (Vendor)
2 May 03 2:18
Well,

On the tools side of things.  A 66 or 110 blade runs about 18 bucks according to a couple vendors I looked at, while a bix blade goes for around 40-50.

As far as the blocks are concerned, I can't even find them.
PhoneGuy2000 (Vendor)
18 Jul 03 23:32
A 66 Block runs about $5.oo and an 89 Bracket runs about $.89   a 110 block with legs runs about $10.00 - $12.00 depending on brand. I don't know what a bix goes for down here.

My 2 cents: I have been in telecom in private sector since just after dereg. (20 years now) We have used 66 blocks in large quantities. They are a necessary evil. I like em. I install em. I don't always prefer em. (BTW, I am from Texas) If given my preference, when I design a system, I would prefer to terminate everything to a modular port of a patch panel. It makes moves and changes a snap and identification is a breeze. This is not realistic for most companies though because when some one named it a telecom closet, some architect thought that meant it was a small little room. Patch Panels require a larger footprint and limit access to the unused pairs of the infrastructure without the use of adapters. One reason many people wouldn't do it if they could is that it takes the moves and changes out of the hand of the vendor and empowers the client/customer to do their own "cross connects". I am a vendor and I like MAC orders. But I also do design and when doing so, the clients interest come first. So I guess what I am saying is it's all good....

Yee Haw..

Larry McNeill, RCDD
lmcneill@rx-tech.com

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