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Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

(OP)
I'm not at all certain this is even a wiring block; it could be a distribution block, a lightning arrestor, or some other wonderful piece of tech I still have yet to know about. I've been seeing devices like these hanging from aerial phone lines, mounted next to 66 blocks in businesses, and even outside of apartments. I'm led to believe it's nothing electrical in nature, it's probably just a distribution block. But I can't find a name for it (hell, even finding the picture of it took a few hours). I want to believe it's some sort of 66 block for larger gauge wiring (like the same gauge wire used in the provider side of most NIDs, the two pair cable that I also have no special name for), but I've never had a chance to open one. So, could anyone help me identify this device?


RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Hurts my eyes to look at that wall. What a mess. thumbsdown

I love2 "FEATURE 00"
http://dexman.webs.com/

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Most of the messy part appears to be CATV splitters and satellite dish grounding blocks.

I feel your pain, though.

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

That is a "6 Pair Can." It is lightening protection for a 6-pair drop wire or underground cable. It looks like an old one. If the two left corners are sort of bent and pushed in to keep it closed it is from the 1980s or before. Otherwise it is from the early to mid 1990s. Sometime around the Telecom Act of 1996 they changed the demarc rules and started using plastic combined lightening protection and network interface boxes.

It is strictly for copper wire phone service so it has nothing to do with the mess of coax surrounding it.

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

We understood that the interface had nothing to do with the coax cabling. It was noted that the messy appearance is due to the haphazard layout of the cable, splitters and grounding blocks. smile

I love2 "FEATURE 00"
http://dexman.webs.com/

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Back in the day, most telco installers took pride in their work, dressing all wiring with care.
The terminal shown could be either a 104 or 116 type terminal. Likely 116 protector due to its location as a demarc of sorts.
The ears were provided for strand mounting.
The lid was spring-loaded and the hinge mechanism would be on the left edge of the pictured terminal. A lip on the opposite edge held the lid in place and provided a weather seal of sorts. Spiders still had a nice home, though.
Google '460-300-140' and choose the Bell System Practices result. The installation guides were very specific on spacing and physical layout.

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

I was able to enlarge the picture while viewing it on my Surface Pro 3. The number "116" appears to be on the cover as are the letters "AT&T". Some technicians still do care about their work, but, with the decline of landline service...coupled with competition from cable and satellite
providers, the days of professional craftsmanship and proactive maintenance are drawing to a close.

I love2 "FEATURE 00"
http://dexman.webs.com/

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Dexman, I hear you loud and clear. We are a dying breed.

I remember during my apprenticeship we had to dress up wires and use wax cord to make it look good with a knot every 1 cm (not 9 mm or 11 mm if you didn't want to lose points). It was a hell of a pain to do but taught me to be picky later in my career.
Then however (at 17 and 18) I really didn't see the reason behind this.
Now I teach our young guys to do proper work and spend an extra 5 minutes on a job. Also to put a belt on and pull up their damn pants. smile

Joe W.

FHandw, ACSS (SME)


"This is the end of the world, make sure to buy your T-shirt before it is too late"
Original expression of my daughter

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Hey Joe!

The funny thing is I was a IXC/CLEC CO technician for my 23 year career. Minimal premise wiring. But, I do appreciate a proper wiring job. smile

Man, when did telecom techs start to take fashion tips from plumbers? ponder bigsmile

Paul

I love2 "FEATURE 00"
http://dexman.webs.com/

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Westi comment:
"I remember during my apprenticeship we had to dress up wires and use wax cord to make it look good with a knot every 1 cm"

Can I assume that you remember using a cable lacing needle?

Mine was in a central office where it was about 50% running cable and 50% sewing. I particularly remember the 500MCM power cable and the 12 floor vertical drop. It wasn't running but pushing at the beginning and holding at the end.

Ed Fair
Give the wrong symptoms, get the wrong solutions.

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

Ed, I worked for Western Electric and ran a lot of 500MCM and also 750MCM. Those were the good old days. We called the lacing tool a "sewing needle." We sewed everything and made it neat. Crossbar racks didn't require horizontal sewing, however.

Jim

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

I was WE also, assigned to Southern Bell/AT&T Atlanta LD office during the transition from plugboard to crossbar. That was the reason for the new power runs. I got to pull the cable from the spool to the rack until gravity took over, then sewed. Probably 50% power related until one of the layoffs.

Ed Fair
Give the wrong symptoms, get the wrong solutions.

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

I love nostalgic conversations. Means I am getting old according to my wife.
Ed
I did my first 15 years in Germany including my apprenticeship so no cable lacing needle but love to hear it.

I actually went to work in Eastern Germany after the wall came down and they had the Stowger dialers (funny enough I learned the international name just later here in Canada smile) pretty much everywhere and astonishingly they maintained them to pristine conditions. The dialers were in use since the 50's because they were shipped from the west to the east once they were retired there and they built them back up and kept them running.
I met a lot of guys there that spent their entire career repairing them and then watched the electronic CO's replace them. All of those guys would have beaten anyone with a stick that would not have done proper work. Outside on customer premises it is a lot harder to find someone that leaves a mess like the picture above because the time frame between visits is just too large.

Joe W.

FHandw, ACSS (SME)


"This is the end of the world, make sure to buy your T-shirt before it is too late"
Original expression of my daughter

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

(OP)
Thank you all very much for the vast amount of information about this device. Since I posted this, I’ve begun to notice many of these devices around town and in great condition (like new, even). Also, I probably should’ve stated above: this is (1) not my photo, (2) not at my apartment or workplace, and (3) unfortunately not maintained by me. I agree, the wiring in this photo is awful and looks to have been done by someone with no care.

Again, thank you all very much for the info!

RE: Can anyone help identify this type of wiring block?

It would appear like a telephone terminal in a rats nest of coaxial cables...

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