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01071981 (ISP)
19 Aug 10 9:27
Hi All,
I am new to networking and just had one query
I have 2 networks
10.5.20.1
255.255.255.0
and
10.5.120.1
255.255.255.0

My question is that these 2 network will communicate with each other or not.
If some one can provide the brief descripton also that will be great.
waiting for a quick reply.
  
Noway2 (Programmer)
19 Aug 10 9:44
Yes, the two networks can communicate with each other, but no they are not on the same network segment.  Therefore, given the network addresses and masks you will need a router.
The IP address consists of a network portion and a host portion.  The larger the network portion (more bits assigned), the fewer the hosts you can have on that segment.  Hosts that are on the same segment do not need a router to talk to each other.  
If you place both these devices on the same wire and configure them as you have, they will electrically "see" the data, but they will not "logically" see it as it will appear to be for a different network/host.
Some tutorials on network addressing and sub-netting, along with CIDR notation may make things the concept a little clearer.  It isn't a difficult concept, but it can get a little funky in the math.
 
dberg35 (IS/IT--Management)
31 Aug 10 22:06

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