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Smoogan (Programmer) (OP)
22 Feb 08 6:59
Hi all,

I would love to work aboard for a few years, and I'm thinking about applying for Web Development jobs in America.

Whats the best way to approach this?

Just before anyone asks I'm British, Male, 23. Have been in the web development industry for 7 years now.

I'm not looking for an instance turn over, but am looking to hopefully get something in the next 6-8 months.

Thanks
Smoogan
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 7:36
Do you know what part of America you would like to live and work in?  I live in Indianapolis, Indiana.  This area is definitely growing, so there is no shortage of jobs here.  I know quite a few technical recruiters in this area and could help you out if you would like.  
Smoogan (Programmer) (OP)
22 Feb 08 10:19
Hi,

I haven't really thought too much about where in America, certainly a major city. But i've just been speaking with someone and they told me if you don't have a Degree (Which I don't) it can be a huge dis-advantage.

I instead started work at 16 and have nearly 8 years in it. So experience I have... degree I don't.

If you could find out from the recruiters what they think about not having a degree that would really be usefull.

Thanks
Smoogan
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 11:20
I can certainly do that.  I have a good friend who is a programmer/software developer like myself, and he never went to college either.  I think it really depends on the company or even the interviewer.  In my opinion, experience matters more than a degree.  But I'll check with my contacts to see what they say.
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 11:25
In addition to finding a job, you would need to deal with the immigration issue.  Are you expecting your prospective employer to get you a working visa, or do you have that covered already?
Smoogan (Programmer) (OP)
22 Feb 08 11:29
Well I don't know much about visa, or being sponsored. That's why I have 6-8 month plan to find everything out.

I would be looking to be sponsored for a visa, that's for sure.
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 12:11
I would think the visa issue would make it a bit more difficult for you.  I would assume that a company would rather hire someone from the US, since sponsoring someone from another country would cost them more money.  But I'm sure you'll find out more about that in the next 6-8 months.
Smoogan (Programmer) (OP)
22 Feb 08 12:16
I just read somewhere that I would need at least 12 years experience within my field to be able to get a H1B visa.

I don't know why they makes things so hard.
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 12:19
The H1B visa also requires that you have a Bachelor's Degree.  
Smoogan (Programmer) (OP)
22 Feb 08 12:25
You don't have to have 1 if you have 12 years experience.

Is there different types of working visas?
rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 12:31
I don't know...you can check out the USCIS website.

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis

rjoubert (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 13:25
I just got an answer from one of the techie recruiters I know here in Indy.  She said the lack of a degree is not a problem, and she's wondering what tools you use for your web development.  Thanks.
genomon (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 14:54
Who were you working for professionally when you started at age 16?

"Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."

Bandenjamin (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 15:35
Overall in the states it varies greatly from company to company. Some companies I've applied at (I have 8 years experience but only have AA) don't accept any resumes unless you have a four year degree, others wouldn't care if I passed pre-school because of the years of experience. Best advice, just apply. Worst they can do is say no

--Dan
Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
Mark Twain

mrdenny (Programmer)
22 Feb 08 19:54
With the experience that you have you shouldn't have a problem.  The work visa will be the problem.

The easiest think to do will be to call the US consulate in London and ask them what the rules are.  They are there to answer these kinds of things.

Unforunately it's not that easy to get into the US some times for work as the US government tries to make sure that US works are used before workers are brought in from another country.

What languages do you use?

Denny
MCSA (2003) / MCDBA (SQL 2000)
MCTS (SQL 2005 / Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3.0: Configuration / Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007: Configuration)
MCITP Database Administrator (SQL 2005) / Database Developer (SQL 2005)

My Blog

acewarlock (TechnicalUser)
22 Feb 08 23:53
You could come here as an illegeal and get free health care, but you would have to work for less pay.




This is a Signature and not part of the answer, it appears on every reply.

This is an Analogy so don't take it personally as some have.

Why change the engine if all you need is to change the spark plugs.

 

macleod1021 (Programmer)
23 Feb 08 11:41
Unless you have a company set up to sponser you, it's an uphill path (not impossible...but harder).

I'm actually looking at leaving America and it's the same way. I checked in at the Norwegian Consulate in NYC about a month ago and in order for me to get a work permit, I have to have a place to live and a signed employment contract. While that doesn't sound like it's that hard, getting a lease on an apartment is very difficult when you don't have a job in the country...and finding a job in the country is difficult if you're not there.

One thing that the consulate worker did tell me to do was apply for a visiting visa (forgot the actual name and don't feel like pulling out my notebook to get it hehehe) and then go over and find a company that's interested. She said that if the company is really interested, they can pull strings from within the country a lot easier than I could get something done from here in America.

drdoom702007 (TechnicalUser)
28 Feb 08 23:29
Hello rjoubert,

I'm newbe on this forum. I would like to ask you about IT job market in Indy. I'm workng as a nework admin and living in CA. I have about 11 years of expirience. As you may know, life in Ca becoming more and more expensive and for a couple of years I'm thinking to move to another state or another country. Do you think it will be possiable to find a networking or support job in Indy.
rjoubert (Programmer)
29 Feb 08 6:59
drdoom...the tech sector of the job market here in Indy is full of opportunities, and the cost of living is very reasonable.  I moved here from Buffalo, NY about 3 years ago...I don't regret moving for one second.  Buffalo was shrinking, businesses were moving out and so were the people.  Yet the taxes were on the rise.  Indy is booming.  Everywhere you look, new housing communities are popping up.  

Check out Monster.com and do a search for jobs in Indy.  You can also find some tools on Monster to compare the city you live in now to Indy (or other cities).  It will give you an idea of the difference in cost of living, weather, population, crime, etc.  I used that quite extensively to compare Buffalo and Indy.  

Monster's relocation tool... http://monster.moving.com/relocation-center/index.asp


If you decide that you'd like to move forward with your job search in Indy, let me know.  I can put you in touch with several tech recruiters.
beltmanjr (TechnicalUser)
19 Mar 08 5:35
Many countries make it very hard to get a work permit. It is a job in itself to get one. The US, Canada, Australia and the UK have their own ways of making it super hard to get a visa. Australia may take up to 10 months to issue one. These countries also require a certail amount of $$$$ to be in your bank accounts.

The easiest to get a 12 month work permit was New Zealand. I got mine within 30 seconds from the internet (and it is a real one from their online visa department), but I decided to go somewhere else instead for a year.

Good luck with this!! and keep us all updated!
strongm (MIS)
23 Mar 08 9:57
>the UK ha[s] their own way[] of making it super hard to get a visa"

And their own way of making it easy to be an illegal immigrant instead ...
beltmanjr (TechnicalUser)
23 Mar 08 10:00

Quote (stongm):


>the UK ha[s] their own way[] of making it super hard to get a visa"

And their own way of making it easy to be an illegal immigrant instead ...
I think it is wise not to comment on this one and secretly LMAO! spot on!

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