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NorstarOption (TechnicalUser) (OP)
31 May 06 18:03
How do I check what's the ip address assigned to the cdr box so I can access it?
acewarlock (TechnicalUser)
31 May 06 18:25
The only MDR2000 i've seen are serial, no IP.
Telecomlady (Programmer)
31 May 06 20:48
I agree. The MDR2000 that we had was serial with a direct connect. Is it for MAT?
GR8NORTH (Programmer)
1 Jun 06 12:56
MDR2000e has a IP network port.

Just telnet to it, login, and ...

You'll have to go in via the serial port. The MDR web site might have a downloadable manual.
aweshucks (TechnicalUser)
1 Jun 06 13:54
MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage Unit
User’s Reference Manual
(Major Release 3)
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc. MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in
accordance with the terms of such license.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not supplied by
MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc. or its affiliated companies.
The information in this manual reflects version 3.S01.G44 of the MDR-2000 software.
Copyright (c) 1990 - 2001 by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
All rights reserved.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
FCC Class B Digital Device or Peripheral - User’s Notice
Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of
the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Warning
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Overview
2.1 Description .............................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2 Feature Cross-Reference ......................................................................................... 2-4
Chapter 3 Data Collection
3.1 CDR Data Collection .............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1.1 Input/Output Records ............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1.2 Data Selection ......................................................................................................... 3-5
3.1.3 Data Translation ..................................................................................................... 3-6
3.2 Alarm Annunciation ................................................................................................ 3-6
3.3 External Alarm Generation ..................................................................................... 3-8
3.4 Internal Alarm Generation ......................................................................................... 3-8
3.5 Modem Setup ........................................................................................................ 3-9
Chapter 4 Communications
4.1 Computer-To-Computer Commands ...................................................................... 4-1
4.2 Protocol .................................................................................................................. 4-5
4.3 Discrete Polling ....................................................................................................... 4-7
4.4 Large Blocksize Polling ............................................................................................ 4-8
4.5 Data Transmission .................................................................................................. 4-9
4.6 LED Indicators ....................................................................................................... 4-9
Chapter 5 Interactive Monitor
5.1 Command Processor ............................................................................................... 5-1
5.2 Command Descriptions ........................................................................................... 5-2
5.2.1 Set Command Details ............................................................................................. 5-9
5.2.2 Show Command Details ....................................................................................... 5-15
5.2.3 Customize Command Details ................................................................................ 5-16
5.2.4 Digits Table Command Details ............................................................................. 5-18
5.2.5 Alarm Table Command Details ............................................................................. 5-19
5.2.6 Test Command Details .......................................................................................... 5-20
5.3 Messages .............................................................................................................. 5-20
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Table of Contents
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6.1 Preliminary Considerations ..................................................................................... 6-1
6.2 Physical Examination .............................................................................................. 6-2
6.3 Interactive Examination .......................................................................................... 6-3
6.4 Reporting A Problem ................................................................................................ 6-7
Chapter 7 Hardware
7.1 Hardware Overview ................................................................................................ 7-1
7.2 Cables ..................................................................................................................... 7-2
Appendix A ASCII Equivalents
Appendix B User Notes
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Introduction
1-1
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
This manual describes the operational characteristics of the MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage Unit. All
aspects of the operational capability of the MDR-2000 are covered including details for unit setup,
operation and trouble shooting.
Generally reference to this manual will only be required when programming applications software to
interface with the MDR-2000. This information is provided in chapter 4. In addition, reference during
field setup may be required to properly adjust the option settings. This information is found in chapters
3, 5, 6 and 7. Chapter 5 provides details on the Interactive Monitor used for remote setup of the unit.
Chapter 6 provides details on troubleshooting and chapter 7 on the cabling conventions.
For information on sizing the MDR-2000 to meet anticipated storage requirements please refer to the
document entitled ‘MDR-2000 Data Collector Capacity Calculations’. Electrical, physical and
environmental specifications are provided on the MDR-2000 Data Collector brochure. Both of these
documents are available from MDR or your MDR Distributor.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-1
Chapter 2
OVERVIEW
The purpose of this section is to provide a general description of the MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage
Unit. Each of the features discussed in this section will be further described in later sections of the
manual.
2.1 Description
The MDR-2000 is a compact, highly versatile data collection device. It is designed for maintenance
free operation with reliability features to ensure data integrity and low support and service costs.
The MDR-2000 can be installed quickly. It requires a minimum of space and has no environmental
requirements other than those normally found in the office or equipment room.
Once in operation the MDR-2000 will collect call detail record (CDR) data and optionally image data
from the PBX for later transmission and downstream processing. As part of the data collection
process, the MDR-2000 formats the call detail records into an Expanded MDR Standard Record
format. The use of the Expanded MDR Standard Record format means that records collected from
different types of PBXs are presented in a consistent format to simplify downstream processing.
As part of the formatting process, call records can be retained or discarded based on the number of
digits dialed, the duration of the call, and whether it is incoming or internal. This feature facilitates
discarding of incomplete calls and local calls. By varying these parameters fine tuning of the collected
data is made possible. In addition, the MDR-2000 will deduct the duration selected from the time
reported for each call. This feature assists downstream processing accuracy by eliminating circuit
connection and ringing delays.
When collecting maintenance records the MDR-2000 can be set up to report alarms or error conditions.
On these systems the MDR-2000 is used to record this information and optionally alert a
downstream processing facility when preprogrammed alarms occur.
The MDR-2000 is microprocessor based. This approach provides flexibility in keeping the MDR-2000
current with PBX manufacturers’ changing specifications. It also means reliability and maintainability.
The MDR-2000 has diagnostic features to aid in problem determination. As well, keep-alive circuitry
and battery backup are provided to ensure that the MDR-2000 keeps running during power failures.
The MDR-2000 communicates with the PBX via an RS232-C compatible port. Communications with
downstream processing facilities is made possible by using another RS232-C port via direct connection
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-2
or modem. The MDR-2000 can be setup to communicate at speeds up to 19200 Baud, but is limited
by the data capability of the downstream facilities to accept the data at the higher speeds, the modem
equipment and the quality of the transmission lines.
To ensure data integrity, the data transmitted to the downstream processing unit is encapsulated in a
data packet. The packet contains byte count and checksum information to provide error detection
capability. If an error is detected by the software the MDR-2000 is requested to send the packet again.
This feature is important in ensuring the integrity of the downstream report processing.
While the MDR-2000 is transferring data downstream it continues to collect and process information
from the PBX. This facility means that prime-time data collection from the MDR-2000 is practical.
The unique design of the MDR-2000 incorporates the use of hardware and software to isolate internal
data integrity violations. This means that the data stored in the MDR-2000 is interrogated upon
transmission to downstream facilities to ensure that what was originally stored in the MDR-2000’s
large buffer memory is in fact unaltered when selected for transmission.
Commands by the downstream processing unit to the MDR-2000 or by technicians for remote
diagnosis are very simple. Commands exist in two command structures, computer-to-computer and
interactive.
By using groups of computer-to-computer commands the MDR-2000 will perform all of the functions
necessary for automatic data collection. These commands provide the functionality listed below.
Communications Commands:
o Send the current record or block of records to the downstream processing system.
o Advance to the next record or block of records.
o Clear all of the previously transmitted records. This command makes room for new records.
o Reset to the beginning of the buffer. This command helps recover records lost due to downstream
processing failures.
o Doorbell. This command returns a simple ‘Hello’ response to ensure that a connection to the
MDR-2000 has been made.
o Specify which type of records to transmit, CDR or Image records, or both.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-3
Maintenance/Support Commands:
o Pass data from the PBX to the communications port for dynamic monitoring of PBX activity.
Data is still processed and retained by the MDR-2000.
o Send a maintenance record consisting of pointer values, indicator LED values, serial number, and
memory size over the communications port.
o Send an ASCII test sequence over the communications port.
o Commands to reset the MDR-2000’s PBX port, the entire MDR-2000, or the MDR-2000 buffer
memory.
o Test commands to verify the integrity of stored data and check the RAM memories.
o View the last record rejected by the MDR-2000.
o Send an MDR-2000 identification message indicating the PBX type, MDR-2000 generic, and
software revision and serial number.
o Enter the Interactive Monitor (Described later in this document).
The interactive commands are provided by a software module called the Interactive Monitor. It
provides most of the functionality described above but in a more humanly engineered format. Its
purpose is for operational control of the unit. All options are set by the Interactive Monitor to provide
complete control and configuration of the MDR-2000 remotely.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-4
2.2 Feature Cross-Reference
The following table is a feature cross-reference for the more popular PBX and keysystems. It specifies
the call record characteristics by PBX. The terms ‘n/a’ or ‘No’ in the table mean that the feature is not
supported by the PBX or that the MDR-2000 does not currently support it (Usually due to a lack of
information about the PBX data format).
There are many PBX and keysystems on the market sold under various brand names and features can
vary by country, supplier and revision. The MDR-2000 is continually being revised and updated as
new PBXs are supported and features of existing PBXs change. If the PBX or keysystem in question
is not on this list, or you have questions about the information in the table, please contact MDR for the
latest available status.
MDR-2000/PBX Feature Cross-Reference
(Part 1 of 2)
PBX Type Digits
Dialed
Account
Code
Digits
Auth.
Code
Digits
Access
Code
Suppr.
Duration
Accuracy
(Secs)
Meter
Pulse
Ring
Time
Amtelco Generic 16 8 8 Yes 6 No No
AT&T Legend/Merlin 18 n/a 16 No 1 No No
AT&T 75 15 5 7 Yes 6 No No
CBX-I/CBX-II See Rolm-8000/Rolm-9000
Citation 28 8 n/a No 1 No No
Dimension FP Series 18 5 7 Yes 6 No No
Ericsson MD110 20 15 6 Yes 6 Yes Yes
Focus II/III 20 15 n/a Yes 1 No No
Fujitsu 9600 25 15 6 Yes 1 Yes No
Fujitsu Starlog 20 15 n/a Yes 1 No No
GTD-1000 20 8 n/a No 1 No No
GTD Omni 20 11 n/a No 60 No No
Hitachi EX-10 15 n/a n/a Yes 6 No No
IDS-128 26 6 n/a No 60 No No
InterTel 32/128 24 8 n/a No 60 No No
iSDX V2.x Series 18 8 n/a Yes 1 Yes Yes
Isotech 36 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-5
MDR-2000/PBX Feature Cross-Reference
(Part 2 of 2)
PBX Type Digits
Dialed
Account
Code
Digits
Auth.
Code
Digits
Access
Code
Suppr.
Duration
Accuracy
(Secs)
Meter
Pulse
Ring
Time
ITT 3100L 15 5 7 Yes 6 No No
Iwatsu 26 12 n/a No 60 Yes No
Lexar 18 10 10 Yes 6 No No
Lucent Generic 14 14 6 Yes 1 No No
Meridian 1 Series 28 10 10 No 2 No No
Mitel SX Series 23 12 n/a No 1 Yes Yes
Mercury-1000 16 6 4 Yes 1 No No
Neax-12A 15 5 n/a Yes 6 No No
Neax-2400 24 10 8 Yes 1 No No
Nec Electra 22 14 n/a No 1 No No
Norstar 28 10 n/a No 2 No No
Panasonic Keysystems 36 8 n/a No 1 Yes No
Perception 18 12 n/a Yes 1 No No
Phillips VOX 16 8 6 Yes 1 Yes No
Plessey K1 12 6 n/a No 1 No No
Plessey K2 16 6 n/a Yes 1 No No
Prodigy 21 10 n/a Yes 6 No No
Rockwell Galaxy 16 6 n/a No 1 Yes Yes
Rolm 8000 15 10 n/a Yes 60 No No
Rolm 9000 16 10 12 Yes 6 No No
Siemens Saturn Series 16 11 4 Yes 1 Yes No
Siemens SD192 15 4 n/a No 60 No No
Toshiba Strata Series 28 8 n/a No 1 No No
Telrad 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
Tie 16/48 22 9 n/a No 1 No No
Tie 24/64 19 n/a n/a No 1 No No
Tie Meritor 16 8 n/a No 1 No No
Tie Ultracom 16 8 n/a No 60 No No
Trillium Panther 20 12 n/a No 1 No No
Vantage-48 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
Voldavi Series 22 9 n/a No 60 No No
Win Comm. Generic 18 11 11 No 60 No No
580 DSS 22 7 n/a Yes 1 No No
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-1
Chapter 3
DATA COLLECTION
The purpose of this section is to describe the data collection process as well as the contents and format
of the data used by the MDR-2000.
3.1 CDR Data Collection
This section describes the details of call detail record collection on the MDR-2000. It covers the
conversion of PBX CDR records to Expanded MDR Standard Format, the available data selection
options, and the data translation defaults that are used.
Information on the Expanded MDR Standard Format is provided to assist in downstream processing
applications.
All data is collected from the PBXs over a 300 to 19200 Baud, RS232-C compatible port. This is
generally achieved by requesting the PBX supplier to enable the port on the PBX. In general, the PBX
CDR port must be configured for a standalone hardcopy terminal. That is how the MDR-2000 looks
to the PBX.
3.1.1 Input/Output Records
A variety of PBXs are supported by the MDR-2000 and new ones are added to the list as required.
Each individual PBX requires a custom ROM (Read-Only Memory) chip for that PBX generic. The
differences that exist between ROM versions is entirely limited to the translation software. The
translation software is that component of the MDR-2000 that converts PBX specific data into the
Expanded MDR Standard Format CDR records.
Each record sent from the PBX is terminated by, or preceded by, a carriage-return/linefeed pair, and
one or more of the following characters; NUL, DEL, DC1, DC2, or DC3. These special characters are
ignored, the carriage-return is required.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-2
The following information must be output by the PBX in order for it to be a suitable device for MDR-
2000 and downstream processing:
Field Name Description Minimum
Size
Maximum
Size
ORGID The originating trunk/extension. 1 7
TERID The destination trunk/extension. 1 7
STARTIME The time the call began. 4 6
DATE The date of the call. 4 6
DURATION The length of the call. 4 6
METER Meter pulses (where applicable). 0 5
RING Ring time (where applicable). 0 3
DIGITS The actual digits dialed. 0 PBX Max.
ACCOUNT An optional account code. 0 14
AUTHCODE An optional authorization code. 0 10
The time fields are in a format that provides for hours, minutes and seconds. If seconds are not
available then the accuracy of the reported data will be to the minute. The MDR-2000 defaults
unavailable seconds fields to zero.
The date field requires month and day, or the Julian date which is the day of the year. The year field is
not used.
In the digits field there is no absolute minimum. However, if digits dialed are not output then the CDR
information is of limited value in downstream processing applications. The MDR-2000 can be
programmed to accept as few digits as required.
Any records that do not match the format as described in the PBX specific ROM will be discarded.
The MDR-2000 provides no error recovery for corrupt records from the PBX.
The output record from the MDR-2000 is in Expanded MDR Standard Format which is described in
the following table:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-3
Field Name Starting
Position
Length
(Bytes)
Type Comments
Record Type 1 A X or B
Record Number 2 3 9 Modulo 1000
Customer Number 5 2 9 Usually 00
ID Type 7 1 A T, D, A or I
Originating ID 8 7 9
ID Type 15 1 A T, D or A
Terminating ID 16 7 9
Date 23 4 D mmdd
Time 27 4 9 hhmm
Duration 31 6 T hhmmss
Flag Byte 37 1 9 (0 - 7)
Meter Pulse 38 5 9
Digits 43 9 See Notes Below
ID Type: The ID type field indicates the type of originator or terminator of a call. ‘T’ for trunk, ‘D’ for
extension, or ‘A’ for attendant. If the ID type for the Originating ID is an ‘I’ then this record is an
image record and not a CDR record.
Flag: The Flag Byte is PBX specific and is designed to provide additional information about the call
record. It is presented as a single digit from 0 - 7 which is interpreted as a bit pattern. Flag byte
definitions are PBX specific, and as such may change depending on the PBX, the following bit
definitions which have been assigned are; Bit 0 (Hex 1) indicates an expensive route was detected by
the PBX, Bit 1 (Hex 2) indicates the call utilized the Answer Supervision capability, and Bit 2 (Hex 4)
indicates that the call record was a transfer from an original call.
Meter Pulse: The Meter Pulse field will always be zero on systems which do not utilize the Meter
Pulse feature.
Digits Field: The digits field has a variable length limited by the capacity of the PBX digits dialed field.
This field also includes the ring time, account code, authorization code, and calling line identification
fields. These fields are made part of the digits field because of their greatly varying attributes among
different PBX’s. On smaller systems none of them may be found. The following paragraphs describe
each of the digits dialed subfields:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-4
Ring Time: The ring time, if present, will always be the first field in the digits dialed. It can be
detected by the presence of a ‘T’ which is followed by the 3 digit ring time in seconds. If no ‘T’ is
detected as the first character then there is no ring time field. Ring time is always reported if
supported by the PBX.
Account Code: The account code is separated from the digits dialed by an ‘#’. The position of the
account code may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing system must
parse the digits field for the ‘#’ and following digits.
Authorization Code: The authorization code is separated by a ‘A’. The position of the authorization
code may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing system must parse
the digits field for the ‘A’ and following digits.
Calling Line Identification: The calling line identification is denoted by a ‘D’. The position of the
calling line identification may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing
system must parse the digits field for the ‘D’ and following digits.
Fields are defined by their starting position in the record, the length in bytes and the type. Types are
one of the following:
A Alphabetic character (A through Z).
9 Numeric field (digits 0 through 9 and ‘.’).
T Time field in the format ‘hhmmss’.
D Date field in the format ‘ddmm’.
Variable Fields: There is potential for other fields to be included in some models of the MDR-2000
and in data streams used as input to downstream processing. To facilitate these fields the ‘I’ designator
in the Digits Dialed field has been employed.
If an ‘I’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field it will be followed by an indicator from ‘0’ to ‘9’. The
indicator specifies the type and length of the data to follow. Several indicators have been implemented
as of this writing, as follows:
When ‘I0’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field the three digits following it are the Hold Time for the
call. For example, if the string ‘I0002’ is found in the Digits Dialed field then this call has been on hold
for 2 seconds.
When ‘I1’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field the three digits following it are the Extended Duration
Hours digits for calls 100 hours and longer. These three digits concatenated with the two hour digits
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-5
on the duration field can be used to construct a duration field in the format of ‘99999:99:99’ for
downstream processing.
‘I9’ is an optional field terminator. ‘Ix’ fields can be terminated based on several criteria. Firstly,
the field may be of a fixed length, such as the ‘I0’ field. Secondly, the field may be at the end of the
Digits Dialed field and therefore is terminated by the end of the record. Thirdly, the field may be
variable length and have to be terminated by the presence of the ‘I9’ designator. In any event, any
parsing routines should always detect ‘I9’ or the end of the record as the end of the current field.
Other Notes: If the record type is ‘X’ then this indicates a normal Expanded MDR Standard Format
record. If the record type is ‘B’ then the MDR-2000 has detected an internal error on transmitting the
record that has resulted in the record’s contents being changed. The record can be discarded by the
host system to avoid processing errors. In addition the MDR-2000 error indicator (LED CR4) is
turned on. The presence of ‘B’ type records is symptomatic of a hardware malfunction in the MDR-
2000.
If the record type is an ‘N’ then this indicates an older MDR Standard Format record which will be
found in major release 1 and major release 2 version units. Please refer to the earlier MDR-2000
Reference Manual for details on this record format and the MDR-2000 capabilities.
3.1.2 Data Selection
As calls are received by the MDR-2000 they are scanned to ensure that they conform to the PBX
specific format. If they do, then they are translated to Expanded MDR Standard Format, compressed
and stored in the buffer storage.
Conformance includes two additional constraints. Firstly, the call duration must exceed the selected
‘Minimum Call Duration’, and secondly the number of digits dialed must exceed the ‘Minimum Digits
Dialed’ value. These values are set using jumpers on the MDR-2000 or by commands to the
Interactive Monitor which are described later in this manual.
An exception to the ‘Minimum Digits Dialed’ constraint are those calls with digits dialed whose
beginning digits match the values set with the ‘DIGITS TABLE’ command in the Interactive Monitor.
These sequences ignore the ‘Minimum Digits Dialed’ constraint.
If records do not conform they are discarded or may be stored in image format if image collection is
enabled (see Interactive Monitor). Records that are discarded because they failed to meet the
minimum constraints but are otherwise in the correct format are not collected by the image collection
when discarded, only records that did not meet the PBX’s CDR format are saved.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-6
3.1.3 Data Translation
The actual process of translating PBX specific records into Expanded MDR Standard Format is
relatively straight forward. Each field of an incoming record is analyzed as necessary to derive the
information for the output record. The translation is dependent on the PBX being supported. Any
fields which are not present, that can be defaulted, are set to specific values.
The customer number is defaulted to ‘00’, the record number is assigned a sequential 3 digit number,
and the auxiliary ID is defaulted to spaces. In addition, incomplete fields, such as a time field with no
seconds, has the seconds field set to ‘00’.
Finally, the originating and terminating ID fields are right justified and zero filled if they are shorter than
the maximum size. The digits dialed/account code field is terminated by a Carriage-Return/Linefeed
pair.
3.2 Alarm Annunciation
When alarms are enabled the Alarm Table (see Interactive Monitor, Set Alarm, Set Primary Phone, Set
Secondary Phone and Alarm Table commands for details) is scanned for each image record that is
processed. When an entry in the table matches the starting characters of the image record then the
repeat count for that entry is decremented. When the repeat count reaches zero it is reset and an alarm
is raised. The MDR-2000 will then use the telephone number stored with the Set Primary Phone and
Set Secondary Phone commands to dial a Hayes compatible modem and then dump an alarm message.
Note that these records are only retained in the MDR-2000’s buffer if image collection is enabled (See
Set Image command).
In order to successfully use this capability there must be a dedicated modem and computer at the
receiving end to accept the alarm message. The MDR-2000 will output the formatted message when
the modem at the receiving end answers the telephone.
The message is output with the standard MDR-2000 protocol layered around the alarm message as
follows:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-7
Field # Example Description
1 X Record type ‘X’ for expanded record.
2 01/19 Date of the alarm taken from the MDR-2000 (mm/dd).
3 12:42 Time of the alarm taken from the MDR-2000 (hh:mm).
4 012345 MDR-2000 serial number.
5 01 Site Number of the MDR-2000 (see Set Site command).
6 REMOTE1 Site Name of the MDR-2000 (see Set Name command). This field is
20 bytes in length, blank filled.
7 ERR009 Alarm code as generated by the PBX. The format is variable
depending on the PBX. The MDR-2000 outputs codes in the form
M2Kxxx: for internally detected alarm conditions.
8 Pwr. Failure Alarm description in freeform as output by the PBX.
The Alarm Code and description fields will contain the exact string that caused the alarm. The Site
Number field is used in cases where the receiving application may wish to poll the MDR-2000. This
enables the application to determine the files in which to store the alarm data.
Note that this record format is compatible with MDR’s Maintenance and Alarm Reporting System
(MARS) which is the downstream processing module used with the MDR-2000 alarm features.
The MDR-2000 follows a specific algorithm in reporting its alarms and the host system (MARS) must
accommodate this algorithm.
When an alarm occurs the MDR-2000 determines if an alarm is already being reported. If there is one
in progress then the second alarm is not reported. The theory is that if one alarm is being reported for
a PBX then successive messages within a short timeframe need not be annunciated. If their recording
is important then image collection must be enabled.
If no alarm reporting is in progress then the MDR-2000 checks the Primary Phone Number field, and if
valid begins the dialing process. When the line is busy or some other error is detected the MDR-2000
will retry autodialing up to the number of retries specified in the ‘Set Retries’ command (default 5). If
the Primary Phone Number field is empty then it assumes a direct connection and simply sends the
alarm record in the format previously listed with the appropriate protocol layer (see the Protocol
section later in this document for details).
When the record has been sent as determined by the Primary Phone Number, it then directs its
attention to the Secondary Phone Number. The MDR-2000 uses the Secondary Phone Number in
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-8
exactly the same way as the Primary Phone Number except that if the entry is empty no action is taken.
This is the means to suppress the reporting of an alarm to a secondary destination.
After the record is sent the MDR-2000 waits for an ACK character (06H) to be sent by the host. If no
ACK is sent in approximately 2 seconds the record is retransmitted. Any character other than the ACK
also causes the record to be retransmitted. The retransmission will occur up to 10 times after which
the MDR-2000 will simply disconnect.
3.3 External Alarm Generation
On certain models of the MDR-2000, those with 24 external jumpers labeled ‘A’ through ‘X’,
detection of external events is possible. When power is first applied to the MDR-2000 it retrieves and
stores the status of the 24 jumpers for reference. When the condition of one of the jumpers changes
this generates an alarm.
The alarm is reported with a condition code of ‘M2KEXT:’ followed by the letter corresponding to the
jumper. If multiple jumpers change simultaneously then they will all be reported on the same alarm
message.
These jumpers report a change in the condition of the jumpers, and give no indication of the open or
closed status of the jumper. Therefore it is incumbent on the implementers of the system to ensure that
the initial condition of the jumpers is what is expected as normal. The change in jumper condition must
be held for a least 1/2 second, a feature incorporated to help reduce nuisance alarms and also to help
with the circuit debouncing logic.
In designing circuitry to open or close the jumpers the implementers must be careful not to apply any
voltage or current to the jumpers that may damage the MDR-2000. As a guideline, the circuit must be
equivalent to a dry reed relay contact closure.
3.4 Internal Alarm Generation
The MDR-2000 has the capability of reporting internally generated alarms which result when certain
conditions internal to the unit occur. These messages are reported in the same format as the external
and PBX generated messages described in the previous sections. The following is a description of the
internally generated alarms:
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Code Message Description
M2KTHR Storage Threshold Exceeded The threshold set with the Set Threshold
command has been exceeded
M2KIDL PBX Idle Time Threshold Exceeded This alarm indicates that the PBX has not output
any information to the MDR-2000 in the interval
specified with the Set PBX Idle command.
M2KPBD M2K Possible Battery Depletion Indicates that a possible depletion of the internal
backup batteries has been detected (specially
equipped units only).
M2KCCD Contact Closure Detected Indicates that an internal contact closure has been
detected (specially equipped units only).
3.5 Modem Setup
The MDR-2000 is usually not aware of the type of modem that is connected or if in fact it is connected
to a modem or directly to the host computer. When a modem is used it must meet certain criteria in
order for successful operation with the MDR-2000.
The modem must be asynchronous and support the standard ‘AT’ modem command set, which is also
known more commonly as the Hayes command set. The modem must be configured for ‘Full Word’
or ‘Verbal’ responses. These are sometimes referred to as results codes. This is the default setting for
most modems, but can be set by entering the commands ‘ATQ’ or ‘ATQ0’ to enable results codes, and
‘ATV1’ to setup the modem for ‘Full Word’ responses.
Character echo to the ‘AT’ commands must be suppressed. This is done by entering the command
‘ATE’ or ‘ATE0’. The default is ‘ATE1’ which causes the modem to echo characters. As well the
modem must be set to auto-answer mode. This permits the modem to answer the telephone line when
the host computer’s modem is dialing to collect data. The command to enable auto-answer mode is
‘ATS0=1’. The sets the modem to answer the telephone after 1 ring. The default is to disable autoanswer
mode so this command is essential.
These options must be setup before the modem is placed in the field. They are saved by entering the
command ‘AT&W’. Whenever the modem is reset by an ‘ATZ’ command or powered up the settings
stored by the ‘AT&W’ are used.
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If your modem has jumper settings make sure that the modem is not set for ‘dumb’ mode operation. If
it is none of these commands will work. If you are unsure of the status of the settings you can restore
the original factory defaults by entering the command ‘AT&F’.
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Chapter 4
COMMUNICATIONS
The purpose of this section is to describe the commands and protocols used to control and
communicate with the MDR-2000. Commands are necessary to operate the MDR-2000, while the
protocols are used to ensure data integrity over transmission lines.
The MDR-2000 supports a two level command structure. The first level, described here, is used
primarily for computer-to-computer communications. The commands are structured to enable the
MDR-2000 to transfer large volumes of call data to a host computer for downstream processing.
The second level of commands is implemented in the Interactive Monitor and these commands are
designed for human interaction. The commands are structured to provide remote operation and
diagnosis of the MDR-2000. The Interactive Monitor is described in Section 5.
4.1 Computer-To-Computer Commands
The MDR-2000 operates over full duplex lines at speeds up to 19200 Baud. This full duplex capability
is essential for remote control of the MDR-2000. Commands to the MDR-2000 are used to specify a
single operation to be performed by the unit.
Commands utilize a very simple protocol when being transmitted to the MDR-2000. Each command is
preceded by a SYN (ASCII 16H, or Control-V) character and terminated by a carriage-return (ASCII
0DH). The commands themselves are all two characters long.
Commands partially entered in error can be eliminated by simply typing the SYN character followed by
the correct command. The normal keyboard editing characters such as Delete or Backspace have no
meaning. The command does not echo on the user’s terminal. This is consistent with the operation
under program control, which is the normal case.
The computer-to-computer commands are as follows:
BE - The ‘BEgin’ command moves the buffer pointers to the beginning of the current data storage
buffer. This command must be used with caution since it may result in duplicate data in the
downstream processing facility. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to this command.
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CA - The ‘Collect All’ command indicates that both CDR and Image data are to be transmitted
sequentially, as they occur in the buffer, to the data collection software. This is the default mode of
operation. An ‘OK’ message is returned when the command is received and executed properly, and an
‘ERR’ message if SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS is not enabled. The ‘OK’ and
‘ERR’ messages are encapsulated in the same protocol used for data transmission.
CC - The ‘Collect CDR’ command indicates that only CDR data will be transmitted to the host.
Image data records will be skipped. An ‘OK’ message is returned when the command is received and
executed properly, and an ‘ERR’ message if SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS is not
enabled. The ‘OK’ and ‘ERR’ messages are encapsulated in the same protocol used for data
transmission.
CI - The ‘Collect Image’ command indicates that only Image data will be transmitted to the host.
CDR data records will be skipped. An ‘OK’ message is returned when the command is received and
executed properly, and an ‘ERR’ message if SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS is not
enabled. The ‘OK’ and ‘ERR’ messages are encapsulated in the same protocol used for data
transmission.
CL - The ‘CLear’ command causes the erasure of data from the beginning, up to but not including the
current buffer pointer location, in the currently selected data storage buffer. A ‘CLR’ message is
returned when the clear action is complete. The ‘CLR’ message is encapsulated in the same protocol
used for data transmission. This command also causes the ‘ERR’ LED to be reset.
If the SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS option is selected and ‘CC’ or ‘CI’ is in effect
then this command has additional functions. Under these circumstances it will force a ‘BE’ command
followed by a ‘CA’ command. The result is to move the data collection pointers to the beginning of
the buffer and then advance to the first non-deleted record, either CDR or image type. If there are
none then it simply moves to the end of the buffer which is exactly the same function that it has when
SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS is disabled.
For example, to collect CDR data followed by image data the host data collection software can send a
‘CC’ command and then collect all of the CDR data. When the ‘CL’ command is issued followed by a
‘CI’ command the MDR-2000 will be positioned so that the host data collection software can now
collect the image data.
CT - This command causes a short diagnostic message to be displayed indicating the hardware
platform for which the microcode resident in the EPROM has been generated. This command is useful
in the manufacturing process to ensure that the correct EPROM has been installed on a particular
platform.
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DB - The ‘Door Bell’ command causes an immediate ‘HE’ response, followed by a Carriage
Return/Linefeed pair, from the MDR-2000. It is used to ensure that the MDR-2000 is active and
waiting for commands. This command also cancels an active ‘DU’ command and issues a ‘CA’
command to cause collection of both CDR and Image data.
DU - The ‘DUmp’ command causes all data received on the PBX port to be immediately output over
the modem port. Data continues to be collected normally. The data dumped over the modem port is
unedited. When the Interactive Monitor is activated this command is canceled. There is no reply from
the MDR-2000 to this command. Note that execution of the ‘IM’, ‘SD’, ‘FD’ or ‘DB’ commands
causes cancellation of the dump.
FD - The ‘Formatted Dump’ command causes the MDR-2000 to output formatted CDR records
automatically over the modem port as they are processed. These records are in exactly the same
format as those output by the ‘XT’ command including the protocol information. This command is
useful for ‘trickle transmit’ applications where the MDR-2000 will be on-line at all times. Note that
execution of the ‘IM’, ‘SD’, ‘DU’ or ‘DB’ commands causes cancellation of the formatted dump.
ID - The ‘IDentification’ command outputs several lines of text containing information about the
MDR-2000 including the PBX generic supported, software revision, serial number, and copyright
notice. No protocol is used with this output.
IM - The ‘Interactive Monitor’ command invokes the Interactive Monitor, if present. When invoked,
an active ‘DU’ command is canceled. Data collection proceeds as usual. Any other computer-tocomputer
command, preceded by the requisite SYN character, will cause the Interactive Monitor to
exit.
MR - The ‘Master Reset’ command is used to reset the entire MDR-2000 system. This command
causes an immediate hardware reset with the loss of all data. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to
this command.
OK - The ‘OK’ command is used to advance the buffer pointer to the next logical record in the
currently selected data storage buffer. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to this command. Its
successful reception by the MDR-2000 can be tested by transmitting a data record and comparing it to
the previously transmitted record. If they are the same the ‘OK’ command was not received by the
MDR-2000 correctly.
Note: If the SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS option is selected and the ‘CI’ or ‘CC’
commands are in effect then the ‘OK’ command is destructive. Any records which are passed over
by the ‘OK’ command are marked as deleted and cannot be recovered by using a ‘BE’ command and
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recollecting. In practice the ‘BE’ command is seldom used for this purpose so that this characteristic
of the ‘OK’ command is of little practical value.
RB - The ‘Repeat Block’ command is used in conjunction with the ‘XB’ command to retransmit a
block of records. Only a single ‘RB’ can be used and it can only be used after an ‘XB’ command. It is
only required if the downstream data collection facility detected an error in a block of records sent
using the ‘XB’ command.
RN - The ‘Reset NVR’ command will force initialization of the non-volatile RAM (NVR) to the
factory settings. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to this command.
RP - The ‘Reset Port’ command initializes the PBX port, clearing any errors that may have caused the
port to cease operation. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to this command.
SD - The ‘Stop Dump’ command cancels the DU command. This command is automatically invoked
when the Interactive Monitor is activated. There is no reply from the MDR-2000 to this command.
SM - The ‘Send Maintenance’ command is used to transmit an MDR-2000 maintenance record to the
host system. This record is not the same as a PBX maintenance record; it pertains to the MDR-2000
itself and not the PBX. The record is encapsulated in the same protocol used for data transmission.
TE - The ‘TEst’ command causes a single line of test characters to be dumped over the modem port.
No protocol is used with this output.
VW - The ‘VieW’ command displays the last invalid record received on CDR configurations. If no
invalid records have been received, the word ‘Empty’ will be issued. No protocol is used with this
output.
XB - The ‘Transfer Block’ command send a block of records at the current buffer pointer location in
the currently selected data storage buffer. Each record is individually encapsulated in the protocol
described in the next section. An ‘END’ message is returned when the buffer is empty or the pointers
have been advanced past the last block of records in the buffer. Advancement of the pointers to the
next block of records is automatic. Therefore successive ‘XB’ commands return successive blocks of
records. Use the ‘RB’ command to repeat a block if an error is detected in the transmission of any
record in the block. If insufficient records are stored for a complete block then a partial block will be
sent.
XT - The ‘Transmit’ command sends the record at the current buffer pointer location in the currently
selected data storage buffer. This record is encapsulated in the protocol described in the next section.
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An ‘END’ message is returned when the buffer is empty or the pointers have been advanced past the
last record in the buffer by the ‘OK’ command.
19 - Sets the modem and PBX port baud rates to 19200 temporarily. This command is used for
automated testing of the MDR-2000. The MR command causes them to reset to their previous values.
4.2 Protocol
The MDR-2000 utilizes protocols to ensure the integrity of the data transmitted to the host system.
There is no protocol used between the MDR-2000 and the various PBXs. The following paragraphs
describe how the collection process should be handled by any third-party utility that is designed to
download data from the MDR-2000. The process described is for transferring data a single record at a
time. Refer to the section on ‘Large Blocksize Polling’ for details on downloading multiple records per
transfer request.
The first level of protocol applies to the coordination of communications between the MDR-2000 and
the host system. This protocol is basically summarized by the fact that the MDR-2000 transmits data
only when requested by the host. The MDR-2000 never initiates data transmission. Even when it dials
the host system for alarm conditions the host must initiate the transmission of data.
In some cases proper reception of commands from the host to the MDR-2000 must be inferred. For
example, if the ‘ID’ message is returned, then one can safely infer that the ‘ID’ command was properly
received by the MDR-2000.
A more difficult situation is the ‘OK’ command. To ensure its correct reception the previous record
transmitted as the result of an ‘XT’ command must be compared to the current record transmitted. If
they are different then it is a proper assumption that the ‘OK’ command was properly received and
processed by the MDR-2000.
There are some commands for which proper reception cannot be inferred. These are the ‘XT’ and the
‘CL’ commands. To ensure accurate communications with the MDR-2000 these commands return
values, encapsulated in a data packet.
This second level of protocol, which uses the data packet, applies to the transmission of call records
from the MDR-2000 to the host system only. In addition, the ‘CL’ command responds with a ‘CLR’
message which is also sent as a data packet.
The packet consists of the data message encapsulated in the protocol. The data is preceded by two
SYN (ASCII 16H) characters, an 8-bit byte count, a 3 byte modulo 1000 sequence number, and the
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Customer Number which is usually ‘00’. The data follows the byte count and it is followed by 2 8-bit
characters containing a 16-bit checksum of the data.
The first byte in the checksum is the low order digit and the second byte the high order digit. The
highorder bit (bit 7) of both checksum bytes is always ‘0’. The checksum is an arithmetic sum of the
data portion of the packet. If either byte calculates to a ‘0DH’ then that byte is incremented by ‘1’.
The last byte in the message is always a Carriage-Return which is used as a record terminator in
packet-switched networks.
In the case of blocks of records transmitted by the ‘XB’ command, each record retains the same format
described above. This includes the two SYN characters and the terminating Carriage-Return on each
record in the block. It is the responsibility of the downstream processing facility to process each record
in the block.
All retransmission is handled by the host system, as it is responsible for testing the checksum and,
because the MDR-2000 never initiates communication, it is the host system’s responsibility to handle
error conditions by requesting retransmission.
In the case of CDR data the data collection routine should check the first character for a ‘X’ (Normal
expanded record) or ‘B’ (Bad record) and take appropriate action. When the record is stored, a record
terminator (Carriage-Return/Linefeed) may have to be appended depending on the recording device
and method.
A collection routine can determine if the information from the MDR-2000 is CDR or image data by
examining the ID Type following the Customer Number. If this is an ‘I’ then the remainder of the
record constitutes the image data received from the PBX (or other device).
4.3 Discrete Polling
Under normal circumstances the MDR-2000 collects call detail (CDR) data which is preprocessed and
optionally any non-CDR data which it stores in an unprocessed image format. When polled by a host
system the CDR and image data records are transmitted in the order they arrived from the PBX. The
host system can separate the two formats of data by testing the record type affixed by the MDR-2000
when it processes the data records. This is done automatically by the downstream data collection
modules found in MDR products.
Certain users may find it necessary to collect CDR data at one site, or on one downstream machine,
and image data on another. For these applications descrete polling of CDR or image data has been
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implemented in the MDR-2000. With the descrete polling commands it is possible for polling modules
on host computer systems to collect either CDR or image data and have other processes on another
host computer collect the remaining type of data.
The descrete polling commands are all covered under sections of this manual dealing with the
commands and details on them can be found there. The commands used in discrete polling are SET
DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS found in the Interactive Monitor, and the computer-tocomputer
commands; CL, CA, CI, CC, OK, DB and BE.
The process of discrete polling is implemented by the cooperative effects of the MDR-2000 and the
downstream polling module. Firstly, the MDR-2000 must have the descrete polling capability enabled
by using the SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS command in the Interactive Monitor.
Then when polling is initiated the host collecting CDR data must issue the ‘CC’ command before it
begins collecting. This command indicates that the downstream facility only wishes to receive the
CDR data.
When the end of the data is reached the downstream facility must issue a ‘CL’ command to clear the
buffer. This has the effect of moving the MDR-2000’s pointers back to their values before data
collection began and then advanced to the first image record. When the second downstream process
begins collecting it must issue a ‘CI’ command to indicate that it only requires the image data.
It is noteworthy that the ‘DB’ command used to determine if an MDR-2000 is active always issues an
automatic ‘CA’ command to effectively disable descrete collection. As well the ‘OK’ command that is
used to advance the MDR-2000’s pointers to the next record for collection now skips over any record
of the wrong type, and flags the last transmitted record as deleted. This operation is largely invisible to
the user or programmer interfacing with the MDR-2000. Finally, it should be noted that if descrete
collection is in progress and only one type of record is being collected (say CDR for example) then the
MDR-2000 may become full with image records and deleted CDR records even though the data
collection process reveals that the buffer is empty of records.
Also in this case the residual deleted CDR records will still be reflected in the ‘Number of Records
Stored’ and ‘Records to be Collected’ fields of the SHOW STATUS command in the Interactive
Monitor. Therefore these fields remain accurate indicators of the storage utilized in the MDR-2000
but not necessarily true indicators of how many valid records remain.
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4.4 Large Blocksize Polling
Polling records in blocksizes greater than one can significantly improve data transmission rates at
higher baud rates, but is more prone to errors since the blocks of data are larger. The larger blocks
means that if an error occurs the entire block must be retransmitted. Using this feature is usually not
necessary but has been included with the MDR-2000 for large installations, such as service bureau
operations, where the elapsed time for overnight data collection is sometimes a constraint.
The MDR-2000 must be configured to transmit data in blocksizes greater than 1 record per block.
This is done by using the SET XFER BLOCK command in the Interactive Monitor. Blocksizes from 1
through 255 may be specified.
Two dedicated computer-to-computer commands are used to transmit large blocks of records. These
are the ‘XB’ and ‘RB’ commands which are both described in the section on ‘Computer-to-Computer
Commands’. Using the Transfer Blocksize does not affect the used of the regular computer-tocomputer
commands, ‘XT’ and ‘OK’, used in downloading single record blocks.
The ‘XB’ command is used as a replacement for the ‘XT’ command to transmit a block of records.
Each record in the block has a complete protocol as described in the section ‘Polling’ in this manual.
Successive ‘XB’ command download successive blocks of records, the ‘OK’ command is not used and
there is no replacement for it when working with large blocks.
If an error is detected in any of the records in a block then the entire block must be retransmitted.
Since the MDR-2000 has already indexed to the next block after the completion of the previous ‘XB’
command it is necessary to issue an ‘RB’ to reset the pointers to the previous block. Only one ‘RB’
command can be used, they cannot be stacked to move backwards multiple blocks.
When the end of the recorded data has been reached a partial block may be transmitted. This will be
followed by one more block which contains the ‘END’ record. The ‘CL’ command should then be
used to erase the downloaded data from the MDR-2000 thereby freeing up the storage for new data
from the PBX.
4.5 Data Transmission
The MDR-2000 utilizes asynchronous data transmission techniques. It is programmed for 8 data bits,
no parity, and 1 stop bit. Except for the specific cases described below, only 7 of the 8 data bits are
actually used, the high order bit being removed under software control. Note however that the MDRMDR-
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2000 is programmed to receive 8 data bits and therefore any communications equipment interfacing
with the MDR-2000 must be programmed accordingly.
In the situation where parity is forced on the data, and therefore only 7 data bits are possible (as in
some public packet switching services), communications with the MDR-2000 is still possible. This is
accomplished by noting that the MDR-2000 never sends a packet larger than 127 data bytes in any of
its current configurations. This means that the byte count never occupies more than 7 bits. In addition
the two 8-bit checksum bytes (16-bit checksum) can be treated as two 7-bit checksum bytes.
4.6 LED Indicators
To provide immediate diagnostic and operational feedback a series of 8 LED indicators are used by the
MDR-2000. These indicators are designated CR2 thorough CR9 on the circuit boards. Their
meanings are listed on the table below. On units where they are externally visible the external labels are
denoted in the table.
When all of the LEDs are on simultaneously the MDR-2000 is in the initialization sequence. The
troubleshooting section of this manual contains more information on the interpretation of these LED’s.
When CR7 is flashing, but not constantly on, the MDR-2000 has reached its call threshold setting (see
SET THRESHOLD command in Chapter 5). When CR7 is constantly on then the buffer is full and
calls are being discarded.
Mnemonic LED Value Description
MSD CR2 ON Modem port transmitting to host
MRD CR3 ON Host system transmitting to modem port.
ERR CR4 ON MDR-2000 hardware error has occurred.
PBX CR5 ON PBX transmitting to PBX port.
BMT CR6 ON
OFF
MDR-2000 buffer empty.
MDR-2000 buffer not empty, call records are being stored.
BFL CR7 ON
Flashing
OFF
MDR-2000 buffer full, additional call records are being
discarded.
Preset threshold reached, buffer not full.
MDR-2000 buffer not full.
INT CR8 ON MDR-2000 processing a hardware interrupt.
RUN CR9 ON
OFF
MDR-2000 running in non-interrupt mode.
MDR-2000 not operational.
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Chapter 5
INTERACTIVE MONITOR
The purpose of this section is to describe the operation of the Interactive Monitor. The Interactive
Monitor provides interactive access to the MDR-2000 hardware for maintenance, diagnostic and
inquiry purposes.
The Interactive Monitor may be viewed conceptually as a distinct software component that probes the
various data areas of the MDR-2000 and provides results or modifies data. It does not affect the data
collection, except that it can modify the operating parameters.
Some of the commands provided by the Interactive Monitor are identical to those provided by the
computer-to-computer commands of the MDR-2000. They are provided again in the Interactive
Monitor for convenience.
To invoke the Interactive Monitor the ‘IM’ command must be issued and the option must be installed
on the MDR-2000. If the option is not installed then the command is ignored. When the Interactive
Monitor is in operation the commands of the standard command processor are not active. If dump
mode (‘DU’ command) is in effect it is canceled.
Data collection is performed while the Interactive Monitor is active except during certain test functions.
When the data collection is disabled the Interactive Monitor will indicate this with a message.
5.1 Command Processor
The Interactive Monitor’s command processor is engineered for human operation as opposed to the
standard MDR-2000 command processor which is engineered for computer-to-computer
communications.
When the Interactive Monitor is invoked, a short signon banner is printed on the terminal. This is
followed by the command processor’s prompt ‘M2K>‘ indicating it is ready to accept commands. The
display appears as follows:
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5-2
MDR-2000e Interactive Monitor
Copyright (c) 2001 MDR Switchview
M2K>
As commands are typed to the Interactive Monitor they are echoed on the user’s terminal. When a
command, or field, is recognized as unique by the command processor it is automatically carried out on
the user’s terminal. Arguments or options can then be selected. Arguments are terminated by pressing
the <Enter> key. Some command strings must be terminated by pressing the <Enter> key to execute
the command, others execute immediately when recognized.
When a mistake has been made, pressing <Control-C> (Press the <CTRL> key while simultaneously
pressing the character ‘C’) will result in the command line being discarded. The command processor
will print the message ‘Canceled’ on the user’s terminal as an indicator that the command has been
discarded.
Whenever a character is typed that is illegal in the current context, then the character is ignored and the
<Bell> is echoed. The <Bell> is a signal to the user that an invalid character has been entered.
The execution of any command can be interrupted by typing <Control-C> at any time.
5.2 Command Descriptions
The following paragraphs describe the individual commands and their associated options. Generally
each command can have 0, 1 or 2 options. These options may be keywords or arguments.
Keywords are entered and recognized by the command processor as commands. That is, when the
system recognizes what keyword is being entered, the option is completed automatically by the
command processor.
Arguments are one of three types: numeric, ASCII, or MDR BCD.
Numeric arguments fall into 3 classes: addresses, values, or repeat counts. Addresses range from 0 to
FFFFFF hexadecimal, values range from 0 to FF hexadecimal, and repeat counts range from 0 to
65,535 decimal. Unless otherwise noted, omitted numeric arguments default to 0.
ASCII arguments can be any character that the keyboard can generate. Characters that are not
printable are echoed as ‘.’, the period. When an ASCII argument is omitted the default is NULL.
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MDR BCD is a special subset of characters used for internal storage of CDR data. MDR BCD
arguments consist of the digits plus the characters ‘D’, ‘A’, ‘T’, ‘#’, and the space.
ADVANCE - This command advances the current record pointer forward one record. If the pointer is
at the end of the buffer, no action is taken.
ALARM TABLE - This command is used to enter and modify the alarm condition table for alarm and
maintenance applications.
BEGIN - This command moves the record pointer to the first logical record. Since the pointer is
moved to the beginning of the buffer the effect is to permit those records to be collected again.
Duplicate records may occur in the downstream processing if this command is used without regard for
data already collected. The ADVANCE command can be used to reduce the data duplication
possibilities.
CLEAR - This command causes the Logical Error Count and the I/O Interrupt Status to be set to
zero. In addition the ERR LED is cleared. This command is not the same as the ‘CL’ command
described in the computer-to-computer communications section.
CUSTOMIZE - This command is used to enter the field settings and PBX customization options
when minor adjustments are required to translate PBX data into Expanded MDR Standard Format.
DIGITS TABLE - This command is used to enter and modify the call exception table for CDR
applications.
DUMP <Addr> <Repeat> - This command prints the contents of memory locations beginning at the
address specified and repeating as indicated. The RAM command is used to select which memory is
accessed, either processor or buffer memory. The MODE command determines the format of the data.
The address is printed in the leftmost column followed by 16 bytes of data.
HELP - This command provides a display of the commands available through the Interactive Monitor.
IDENT - This command prints the MDR-2000 identification message which contains the PBX
generic, revision numbers and copyright notice. This information is extremely useful in isolating data
collection problems. The following is an example of the output:
MDR-2000 Plus
Meridian 1 Generic
Rev. 3.S34.G41
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Interactive Monitor
5-4
Ser. 003423
Copyright (c) 2001 MDR Switchview
MODE - This command sets the mode for DUMP and PUT command value arguments. It executes
automatically when recognized by the monitor and toggles the mode between hexadecimal, ASCII and
MDR BCD input and output. The default is hexadecimal.
OPEN LINK - This command causes the MDR-2000 to permit two way communications from the
modem port to the PBX port which in effect makes the MDR-2000 act as a direct cable. This allows
the user to interactively communicate with their PBX for maintenance related tasks. The command is
terminated by pressing either <Control-C> or <Control-V>. Data collection and alarm annuciation are
disabled during an Open Link session.
PUT <Addr> <Value> <Value> ... <Value> - This command puts the contents of the string
beginning at the address specified. Up to 16 values may be entered on the command line. Each value
must be separated by a space or comma. The RAM command is used to select which memory is
accessed, either processor or buffer memory. The data format is determined by the MODE command.
QUIT - This command causes an exit from the Interactive Monitor and returns control to the MDR-
2000’s standard command processor. Pressing <Control-V> at any time has the same effect as
entering the QUIT command.
RAM - This command sets the physical RAM that is used for memory addresses. It executes
automatically when recognized by the monitor and toggles the memory selection between the large
buffer memory used to data records, and the smaller processor memory used for program execution.
The default is processor RAM.
READ - This command outputs the current record. It is similar in operation to the ‘XT’ command in
the MDR-2000 command processor except that no protocol is used, and it is terminated by a carriagereturn/
linefeed.
SET <Keyword> - This command sets various parameters in the MDR-2000. If the MDR-2000 is
Rev. 03 or earlier then the hardware does not support non-volatile RAM (NVR) and therefore these
values will be reset after a hardware reset. On later models the values will be automatically restored
after a hardware reset. The keywords and their meanings are listed in the paragraphs below:
SET ALARM <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then critical alarms cause the MDR-2000 to dial the host system.
SET BAUD <xxxxx> <yyyyy> - Sets the baud rates where xxxxx is the PBX port rate and yyyyy is the
modem port baud rate.
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SET BEEP <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then the <Bell> character is signaled when an invalid character is
entered in response to an Interactive Monitor prompt.
SET BYTE SIZE <x> <y> - Set the port byte sizes where x is the PBX port byte size and y is the
modem port byte size.
SET CDR - <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then CDR data is collected, if ‘No’ then CDR data is discarded.
SET DATE <dd> <mm> - Set the default date.
SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS - Enables and disables the data collection commands
(‘CA’, ‘CI’ and ‘CC’) which provide for collection by the host of either CDR data or Image data only.
Note that the word ‘DESCRETE’ is the required spelling.
SET DIGITS <Value> - Sets the minimum digits dialed.
SET DURATION <Value> - Sets the minimum call duration.
SET EXT->EXT <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then internal calls are collected, if ‘No’ then they are discarded.
SET HELP - Provides a list of the SET command parameters.
SET IDLE PBX <Value> - Sets an alarm interval which monitors PBX activity.
SET IMAGE <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then non-CDR data is collected, if ‘No’ then it is discarded.
SET INCOMING <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then incoming calls are retained, if ‘No’ then they are
discarded.
SET METER <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then the meter pulse field (if it is implemented) of the PBX will be
scanned for valid data, if ‘No’ it will be ignored and the output will always be ‘0’.
SET MULTI TENANT <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then for generics which support multi-tenant operation
then on output the customer number field will contain a number corresponding to the tenant.
SET NAME <Value> - Assigns a name to the MDR-2000.
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SET OPTIONS <Value> - Accepts a string of characters used to specify certain MDR-2000 feature
settings.
SET PARITY <x> <y> - Set the ports’ parity where x is the PBX port parity and y is the modem port
parity.
SET PORT RESET <Value> - Sets a timeout interval for the RS-232 ports. If this time elaspes with
no activity then the ports are reset.
SET PRIMARY PHONE <Value> - Sets the first phone number dialed when an alarm occurs.
SET RETRIES <Value> - Set the number of autodialer retries when attempting to annunciate an alarm
condition.
SET SECONDARY PHONE <Value> - Set the second phone number dialed when an alarm occurs.
SET TANDEM <Keyword> - This option is used in situations where the originating ID and terminating
ID are both trunks but for data reporting purposes the originating ID is to be designated as an
extension. When selected the originating ID in trunk-to-trunk calls is converted from a ‘T’ designator
to a ‘D’ designator.
SET THRESHOLD <Value> - Sets the storage limit when an alarm is raised.
SET TIME <hh> <mm> - Set the default time.
SET SITE <Value> - Assigns a site number to the MDR-2000.
SET XFER BLOCK <Value> - Sets the number of records to be transmitted in a block in response to
the ‘XB’ command.
SHOW <Keyword> - The purpose of the SHOW command is to provide a general mechanism to
output information based on a specific keyword which allows for expanded data output as the MDR-
2000 evolves. This command is only available on MDR-2000 units with software revision 3.S01.G08
or later. The keywords and their meanings are listed in the paragraphs below:
SHOW ALARM - Displays the contents of the Alarm Table.
SHOW AUTODIAL - Lists information used by the autodialer including retry thresholds and the user
programmable telephone numbers.
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SHOW DIGITS - Displays the contents of the Digits Table.
SHOW HELP - Provides a list of the SHOW command parameters.
SHOW IDENT - Displays data identifying the MDR-2000 software including PBX generic supported,
software revision, serial number, copyright notice, site number and site name. This command is an
expanded version of the ^VID command.
SHOW MAINT - Displays maintenance data for diagnostic purposes. It is identical to the ^VSM
command except that no transmission protocol is used.
SHOW PORT - Displays the settings for the RS-232 ports and other miscellaneous data collection
settings on the MDR-2000.
SHOW STATUS - This command is identical to the STATUS command described earlier.
STATUS - This command outputs a comprehensive display indicating the values of the various
parameters within the MDR-2000. The values output are as follows:
Date/Time (mmdd hh:mm) Option Settings
Number of Records Stored Records to be Collected
Port Config (PBX/Modem) Minimum Duration
Incoming Calls Minimum Digits
CDR Collection Image Collection
Meter Pulse Detection Multi Tenant Detection
Tandem Conversion Option Internal Calls (Ext->Ext)
Last Scan Error Position Alarm Threshold
Logical Error Count Alarm Enabled
Buffer Memory Size I/O Interrupt Status
Site Name Site Number
Primary Telephone Number
Secondary Telephone Number
When using Descrete Collection Functions, ‘CI’ and ‘CC’ the record counts will always reflect the
total number of call records. This is because records are not physically deleted until both Image and
CDR records have been collected.
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For example, in the case where ‘CI’ mode is set and the image records collected, the final ‘CL’
command used to clear the processed records will position the MDR-2000’s internal registers to the
first CDR record to be collected. The record counts will now include all of the records from the first
CDR record to be collected to the last CDR record, including any already collected image records
which may be interspersed.
This is valid since they still occupy space and do affect the remaining storage capacity of the unit.
These values are cosmetic only and do not affect the operation of the MDR-2000.
TEST <Keyword> - This command is used to run a series of nondestructive tests on the MDR-2000
hardware to check for malfunction. These tests each disable data collection. The keywords and their
meanings are listed in the table below:
TEST HELP - Provides a list of the TEST command parameters.
TEST LOGICAL - Checks the integrity of stored data and reports any errors.
TEST NVR - Checks the integrity of the NVR against those values stored in RAM.
TEST PORT - Sends a test pattern over the modem port.
TEST RAM - Test the processor ram for errors.
Tests can be aborted by entering <Control-C> at any time.
VIEW - This command causes the last record rejected by the MDR-2000 in CDR configurations to be
output.
5.2.1 Set Command Details
The SET command provides for a number of options each affecting the way data is collected. This
section deals with each of these options and the way they are implemented by the Interactive Monitor.
When setting a value using this command, the value is only changed when the command is entered
successfully. This means that when an error is detected in an argument, or <Control-C> is typed prior
to pressing the final <Enter> key, the value in question is not changed.
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In cases where two arguments are to be set, such as the SET BAUD command, changing one
argument does not affect the other. If however, one of the arguments is invalid then neither argument
is changed.
The following paragraphs deal with each of the SET command options.
SET ALARM - This option accepts either ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an argument. If ‘Yes’ is selected then the
MDR-2000 will dial the host system, using the telephone numbers specified with the SET PRIMARY
PHONE and SET SECONDARY PHONE commands. The alarm is raised when the number of calls
specified by the SET THRESHOLD command is reached. The default setting is ‘No’.
SET BAUD - This option accepts two values which specify the baud rate to be used on the PBX port
and the modem port respectively. The baud rates that may be selected are 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600 and 19200. The default setting is ‘1200’ baud for the PBX port and ‘9600’ baud for the Modem
port.
After entering the PBX baud rate the <Enter> key must be pressed for the modem baud rate prompt.
Care must be taken when changing the modem baud rate since the host terminal must also have its
baud rate changed before communications can continue. The change in baud rates takes effect only
after exiting the Interactive Monitor.
Also note that if the change is made over a modem that the modem’s speed must be altered. Many
modems will allow 300, 1200 and 2400 baud communications but a new call will have to be established
before the changed baud rate will take effect. If a baud rate that is not supported by the modem is
selected the MDR-2000 will NOT be able to communicate.
It is not essential that both baud rates be at the same setting, however it is preferred. In any case, the
PBX baud rate should never be greater than the modem baud rate.
SET BEEP - SET BEEP <Keyword> - If ‘Yes’ then the <Bell> character is signaled when an invalid
character is entered in response to an Interactive Monitor prompt. If ‘No’ then invalid characters are
simply ignored. In situations where the Interactive Monitor is used extensively, such as with the ‘Open
Link’ command to PBX maintenance, the preferred setting is ‘No’. This will help inhibit modem
locking problems that can occur when the modem and the Interactive Monitor echo the <Bell> in
response to line noise. The default is ‘Yes’.
SET BYTE SIZE - This option accepts two values which specify the byte size to be used on the PBX
port and the modem port respectively. The byte sizes that may be selected are 5 through 9. The
default setting is ‘8’.
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After entering the PBX byte size the <Enter> key must be pressed for the modem byte size prompt.
Care must be taken when changing the modem byte size since the host terminal must also have its byte
size changed before communications can continue. Note that changing the byte size can be limit the
ability of many communications programs to handle different parity settings. For example, with a byte
size of 8 many programs (i.e. EasyCom) will not allow the parity to be set to anything except ‘N’ for
no parity.
SET CDR - This option accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ argument. If ‘Yes’ then the selective CDR
processing routines to analyze and pack calls are used, otherwise they are not used and all data is
treated as image data. The default setting is ‘Yes’.
SET DATE - This option accepts the date in the form ‘mmdd’. The date is only used for those PBX
generics that do not provide a date field in the CDR record format. In addition, for those PBXs which
output only a daily date the SET DATE command provides an interim date until a date record is
encountered. The date output by a PBX will always supersede this date.
If a valid date cannot be determined then all calls are discarded. This feature is valid in CDR
configurations only.
SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS - This command enables and disables the ability
of the MDR-2000 to selectively transmit CDR data and/or image data. If this command is set to ‘No’,
which is the default setting, then when being polled the MDR-2000 will transmit both CDR and image
data intermixed. The MDR data collection programs will separate the data for the user when it is
received at the host computer.
If set to ‘Yes’ then the polling software can selectively determine that it wants only the CDR or image
data. This feature allows the CDR data to be polled by one host computer and the image data to be
polled by another host computer. The data collection commands used in this process are ‘CA’, ‘CI’
and ‘CC’.
SET DIGITS - This option sets the minimum number of digits that be dialed before the call is stored.
Calls with this number or fewer digits are discarded unless they begin with a sequence of digits
contained in the retention table. The default value of ‘0’ accepts all calls. This feature is valid in CDR
configurations only.
SET DURATION - This option set the minimum call duration in seconds. If a call is placed which has
a duration equal to or less than the number of seconds in this setting then the call is discarded. The
default value of ‘0’ accepts all calls. This feature is valid in CDR configurations only.
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SET EXT->EXT - This command accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ argument. If set to ‘Yes’ then calls
with an Originating ID Type of ‘D’ and a Terminating ID Type of ‘D’ which makes them internal calls,
will be retained. If ‘No’ then these calls will be discarded. The volume of calls retained could increase
dramatically if this setting is ‘Yes’ so caution should be used to ensure that the MDR-2000 has
sufficient capacity to handle the volume. The default setting is ‘No’.
SET HELP - This option causes a list of the SET options to be output.
SET IDLE - SET IDLE PBX <Value> - Sets an alarm interval which monitors PBX activity. If the
interval elapses with no output from the PBX then a single carriage-return character (ASCII 0DH) is
output to the PBX and the response monitored. If there is no response after 2 seconds then an
M2KIDL error message is annunciated. The SET ALARM command must be used to enable alarm
annuncation. The range is between 0 and 59 minutes, the default is 0 which indicates the feature is
disabled.
SET IMAGE - This option accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ argument. If ‘Yes’ then the data rejected by
the selective CDR processing routines is stored in its image form, otherwise this data is rejected. When
SET IMAGE is set to ‘Yes’ SET CDR is automatically set to ‘No’. Therefore make sure that if both
types of data are desired that SET CDR is set to ‘Yes’ after using the SET IMAGE command. Note
that if both SET IMAGE is ‘No’ and SET CDR is ‘No’ data will not be retained by the MDR-2000.
The default setting is ‘No’.
SET INCOMING - This option allows the user to specify whether or not incoming calls are to be
retained or ignored. Note that with some PBXs the digits dialed field is used to determine if this is an
incoming call, and in others the originating ID is used. The default setting is ‘Yes’.
SET METER - This option accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an argument. If yes then the meter pulse
field on the PBX will be scanned for a valid entry which will be placed in the Meter Pulse field of the
output record. If ‘No’ then this field will be ignored but the output Expanded MDR Standard Format
record will contain a zero value in this field.
This setting is only useful if the PBX generic supports the meter pulse capability which is normally
encountered only in areas outside North America. The default setting is ‘No’.
SET MULTI - This option accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an argument. If ‘Yes’ then the Customer
Number field will reflect the tenant using the PBX who placed the call. Note that this field is only
applicable in multi-tenant PBX configurations which support a customer number field. The default
setting is ‘No’.
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SET NAME - This option allows the user to specify a name for the unit. The name has no significance
except that it is easier to identify the unit with a name than a serial number. The name can be
up to 20 characters long. To delete the name completely use either the <Tab> key or simply enter a
single space which has the same effect.
SET OPTIONS – This command accepts a string of characters used to specify certain MDR-2000
feature settings. As of this release the string is three characters in length and are defined as follows:
1. The first character can be either a ‘Y’ or an ‘N’. If ‘Y’ then the MDR-2000 assumes that the
current year is a leapyear. This feature applies only to those PBXs that utilize a Julian date.
The default is ‘N’.
2. The second field can be either a ‘F’ or an ‘L’. If it is an ’F’ then the original extension
responsible for the transfer of a call will be credited with the call, if it is an ‘L’ then the last
extension to handle the call will get credit for the call. This feature is only applicable on a PBX
where the MDR-2000 processes transferred calls (i.e. Meridian 1). The default setting is ‘L’.
3. The third character can be either a ‘Y’ or an ‘N’. If ‘N’ then the MDR-2000 date and time are
updated by valid call records or date records. If ‘Y’ then the MDR-2000 keeps track of the
date and time from its own internal clock. This feature is used on PBX generics where the date
and time are not available on each call record. The default setting is ‘N’.
Note that the string is processed in such a way that any erroneous values entered result in the default
action being applied. Also note that pressing the <Tab> key will cause the default string to be restored.
The default setting is ‘NLN’.
SET PARITY - This option accepts two values which specify the parity to be used on the PBX port
and the modem port respectively. The parity settings that may be selected are ‘N’, ‘E’ or ‘O’ for
None, Even or Odd parity respectively. The default setting is ‘N’.
After entering the PBX parity the <Enter> key must be pressed for the modem parity prompt.
SET PORT RESET- This option sets a timeout interval for the RS-232 ports. If the time specified
elapses with no activity on any port then the ports are internally reset by reprogramming the uarts. The
range is between 0 and 59 minutes, the default is 15. Use 0 to disable the option.
SET PRIMARY PHONE - This option accepts a phone number for use when the MDR-2000 must
call the host computer. The phone number must conform to the Hayes Smartmodem 1200 protocol
and may contain digit control characters allow by the Hayes autodialer. The phone number may be up
to 25 characters long.
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The Primary Phone Number is dialed first followed by the Secondary Phone Number. If the Primary
Phone Number is empty then a direct connection is assumed. To delete the entry use the <Tab> key.
SET RETRIES - This option sets the number of autodialer retries when attempting to annunciate an
alarm condition. When this number of unsuccessful attempts has been completed the alarm condition is
disregarded. The range is between 0 and 255, the default is 5.
SET SECONDARY PHONE - This option accepts a phone number for use when the MDR-2000
must call the host computer. The phone number must conform to the Hayes Smartmodem 1200
protocol and may contain digit control characters allow by the Hayes autodialer. The phone number
may be up to 25 characters long.
The Secondary Phone Number is dialed after the Primary Phone Number. If the Secondary Phone
Number is empty then no connection is assumed and alarm message will not be sent a second time. To
delete the entry use the <Tab> key. Entering a space as the new phone number will not work since the
MDR-2000 would detect this as a legitimate string and attempt to send the message twice.
SET SITE - This option allows a site number to be specified for the unit. The number is intended for
use with alarm applications which may elect to poll the unit after communications has been established
by the MDR-2000. When the alarm annunciation occurs the site number is the means to determine in
which data files to store the collected information. Site numbers are used by the telemanagement
applications to distinguish data between PBX’s. The number can be up to 2 characters long.
SET TANDEM - This option accepts either a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an argument. If ‘Yes’ then the ID
Type on the Originating ID will be converted from a ‘T’ to a ‘D’ on tandem calls. Tandem calls are
defined as those calls which have an ID Type of ‘T’ for both the Originating ID and Terminating ID
fields. The default setting is ‘No’.
SET THRESHOLD - This option accepts a decimal value which is used to determine when the
MDR-2000 should raise a ‘Buffer Full Alarm’. When the number of records in the unit reaches the
value then the MDR-2000 will initiate a call using the digits entered in the SET PRIMARY PHONE
and SET SECONDARY PHONE commands. The default setting is ‘0’.
This alarm has the same format as PBX or external device generated alarms. The alarm code is
‘M2KTHR:’ with a message of ‘Storage Threshold Exceeded’. See the section on Alarm Annunciation
for more details on alarm messages.
SET TIME - This option accepts the date in the form ‘hhmm’. The time is used by the MDR-2000 in
maintenance alarm messages.
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SET XFER BLOCK - Sets the number of records to be transmitted in a block in response to the
‘XB’ command. The block size may be set from 1 to 255 records, the default is 1.
5.2.2 Show Command Details
The SHOW command provides for a number of options each specifying different information to be
displayed. This section deals with each of these options and the way they are implemented by the
Interactive Monitor.
The following paragraphs deal with each of the SHOW command options.
SHOW ALARM - Displays the contents of the Alarm Table. The entries of the Alarm Table which is
setup by the ALARM TABLE command are output one per line on the user’s display. Note that
empty entries will not be displayed. Also, since no scrolling is provided the display may run off the top
of the screen. In this case using a terminal emulation program to capture the table is a suitable
alternative.
SHOW AUTODIAL - Lists information used by the autodialer including retry thresholds and the user
programmable telephone numbers. The retry thresholds are for information purposes only, there are no
commands to alter these settings. The telephone numbers can be modified by using the SET
PRIMARY PHONE and SET SECONDARY PHONE commands.
SHOW DIGITS - Displays the contents of the Digits Table. The entries of the Digits Table which is
setup by the DIGITS TABLE command are output one per line on the user’s display. Note that empty
entries will not be displayed. Also, since no scrolling is provided the display may run off the top of the
screen. In this case using a terminal emulation program to capture the table is a suitable alternative.
SHOW HELP - Provides a list of the SHOW command keywords to be displayed.
SHOW IDENT - Displays data identifying the MDR-2000 software including PBX generic
supported, software revision, serial number, copyright notice, site number and site name. This
command is an expanded version of the ^VID command. The site number and site name are blank by
default. These values can be set by using the SET SITE and SET NAME commands respectively.
SHOW MAINT - Displays maintenance data for diagnostic purposes. It is identical to the ^VSM
command except that no transmission protocol is used. Each of the fields is described in section 6.2
‘Remote Examination’.
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SHOW PORT - Displays the RS-232, Transfer Blocksize and Descrete Mode settings. On the first
line the PBX port is output first followed by the modem port settings. The settings are output as Baud
rate, followed by byte size and then parity. These values can be set with the SET BAUD, SET BYTE
SIZE and SET PARITY commands.
The successive lines display the Transfer Blocksize and Descrete Mode settings. These can be set with
the SET XFER BLOCK and SET DESCRETE COLLECTION FUNCTIONS commands. The
default settings are shown in the example below:
PBX/Modem: 1200-8-N/ 9600-8-N
Transfer Blocksize: 1
Descrete Mode: No
SHOW STATUS - This command is identical to the STATUS command described earlier.
5.2.3 Customize Command Details
The Customize command is used to specify PBX specific information to the MDR-2000. This
information describes the format of the input data from the specific PBX. The Customize command
accepts a single string as an argument. When invoked it outputs any existing string that may have been
previously programmed into it. On certain PBXs a string may have already been programmed as a
default. This is done by those PBXs automatically when they detect that no string exists.
When issued the Customize command will display a list of the preprogrammed choices. The format of
the lines correspond the string formats described below. The choices are followed by the default
Customize string for this PBX, followed by a prompt for user input.
If one of the preprogrammed choices is desired then it may be selected by entering the corresponding
number of the choice prefixed by a ‘#’. For example, preprogrammed choice ‘2’ would be entered as
‘#2’.
When entering a replacement string the entire string must be typed. Usually this will be a modification
from line 1 (default string) or line 2 of the Customize output. To delete a string, and revert back to the
default string enter the <Tab> key, to leave the string unchanged simply press the <Enter> key. To
abort the command with a partially entered string enter <Ctrl-C>. The <Delete>, <Bksp> and other
special keys are not functional with this command.
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The format of the string, and the meaning of its content, varies depending on the PBX. MDR service
personnel can assist you if changes to the string are required. However, in situations where alternate
programming of the string are required the following guidelines can be used:
o A string beginning with a ‘$’ symbol indicates that this string represents the locations of the various
fields in the PBX input record. The format of the string then is:
$val1,val2,val3,...,valn
Where the values ‘val1’ through ‘valn’ are as follows:
Position Field Description
val1 Orgid Originating trunk or station of the call.
val2 Terid Terminating trunk or station of the call.
val3 Auxid Auxiliary ID.
val4 Date Date of the call.
val5 Time Time of the call.
val6 Duration Duration of the call.
val7 Meter Number of meter pulses used during the call.
val8 Ring Ring time to answer the call.
val9 Access Access code.
val10 Digits Digits dialed.
val11 Account Account code.
val12 Authorization Authorization code.
val13 Transfer Transferred trunk or station.
val14 Code Condition code.
val15 CLID Calling line ID (Incoming digits dialed).
val16 Misc 1 PBX specific field.
val17 Misc 2 PBX specific field.
val18 Misc 3 PBX specific field.
o If any values are specified, then all values MUST be specified. The first position in a data record is
referred to as column 1. If the last value entered in non-zero then an additional zero value field
must be entered.
o If a value is not applicable to this PBX then a value must be entered, usually zero.
o The ‘$’ is a flag to the MDR-2000 that this data reflects the column positions of fields in the
incoming record. Alternate flags may be defined on a PBX specific basis.
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o The ‘#’ is a flag to the MDR-2000 that this data is a direct command to the PBX specific module to
load a predefined set of column definitions. Note that if the input does not begin with either a ‘$’ or
‘#’ then the input will be considered invalid and ‘#1’ will be used.
o If errors are detected in the Customize string then the default values will be used.
This feature is very technical but it does allow some measure of flexibility to cope with manufacturer’s
changes in CDR output from the PBX. It is suggested the Customize command only be used under
direction of MDR or its dealer service representatives.
5.2.4 Digits Table Command Details
The ‘DIGITS TABLE’ command allows the user to enter up to 20 strings of characters that are
scanned by the CDR processing configuration of the MDR-2000. Each entry can be up to 8 characters
in length. Each string is composed of any valid ASCII characters except those used to control the table
entry process such as <Control-C>, <Delete>, and <Control-V>.
When the command is invoked the first entry in the table will be displayed followed by a ‘-->‘ as in the
following example:
M2K>Digits Table (Return)
(RET - Leave entry unchanged, TAB - Remove entry, Ctrl-C - Exit command)
9411 -->
The current value of the first entry is ‘9411’ and this may be changed by entering the new value and
pressing <Enter>. To delete the value the user presses the <Tab> key. To leave the entry at its current
value the user simply presses <Enter> at which point the value of the next table entry will be displayed.
To exit from the ‘DIGITS TABLE’ command <Control-C> can be entered, or the <Enter> key can be
pressed until the table is exhausted. The table can be output by using the SHOW DIGITS command.
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5.2.5 Alarm Table Command Details
The ‘ALARM TABLE’ command allows the user to enter up to 25 strings of characters that are
scanned by the image processing configuration of the MDR-2000. Refer to the section on Alarm
Annunciation for more details on alarm processing.
Each entry can be up to 14 characters in length followed by a repeat count of up to 2 digits preceded
by a ‘.’ delimiter as shown in the example below. Each string is composed of any valid ASCII
characters except those used to control the table entry process such as <Control-C>, <Delete>, and
<Control-V>.
When the command is invoked the first entry in the table will be displayed followed by a ‘-->‘ as in the
following example:
M2K>Alarm Table (Enter)
(RET - Leave entry unchanged, TAB - Remove entry, Ctrl-C - Exit command)
B0001.1 -->
The current value of the first entry is ‘B0001’ followed by a repeat count of ‘.1’. This may be changed
by entering the new value and pressing <Enter>. To delete the value the user presses the <Tab> key.
To leave the entry at its current value the user simply presses <Enter> at which point the value of the
next table entry will be displayed.
If a repeat count is not provided then a default of ‘.1’ is inserted by the MDR-2000 automatically.
To exit from the ‘ALARM TABLE’ command <Control-C> can be entered, or the <Enter> key can be
pressed until the table is exhausted.
Alarm table entries are not case sensitive. In fact lowercase characters are converted to uppercase
when entries to the table are made, and any characters from the input stream being checked for valid
alarm conditions are also converted to uppercase.
The table can be output by using the SHOW ALARM command.
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5.2.6 Test Command Details
TEST HELP - This option causes a list of the TEST options to be output.
TEST LOGICAL - This test is intended to detect RAM errors that are more difficult to detect. It is a
more exhaustive RAM test on the MDR-2000. The records stored in the buffer RAM have their
checksums recalculated and compared with those calculated when the record was stored. This is a
more exhaustive test but since it is a logical test it will only examine those memory locations that have
stored, but as of yet uncollected, data.
If the MDR-2000 buffer is empty then this test will always complete successfully, if the buffer is full
then this test is most effective.
For convenience the LEDs will display the progress of the test. The display corresponds to the ones
complement of the record count remaining to be checked, divided by 256. It is provided as an
indicator that the test is progressing since with large buffers filled to near capacity the test will take a
several minutes to complete.
TEST NVR - This test performs a checksum test on the non-volatile RAM.
TEST PORT - This test dumps a continuous test pattern over the modem port. It is used to test the
port or host interface. The test is terminated by entering <Control-C>.
TEST RAM - This test performs a simple read and write test on the processor memory. This is a nondestructive
memory test and as such is not exhaustive. Therefore it is only conclusive when hard
memory errors occur. This test can be interrupted by pressing <Control-C>.
5.3 Messages
The Interactive Monitor will output messages whenever an error or other notable activity has occurred.
These messages are as follows:
Canceled - This message indicates that a command has been aborted by typing <Control-C> or
pressing the Delete key.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Interactive Monitor
5-20
Data Collection Suspended During Test - This message indicates that data collection has been halted
temporarily while this command executes.
Disable Descrete Collection First - This message results when you attempt to change the transfer
blocksize with descrete mode collection enabled. Descrete mode collection must be disabled (default)
before the blocksize can be changed.
Dump Mode Canceled - This message indicates that the MDR-2000 ‘SD’ command was in effect and
has been canceled by the Interactive Monitor.
Exiting - This message indicates that the Interactive Monitor session is being terminated. This is a
result of entering the ‘EXIT’ command or pressing <Control-V>.
Set Xfer Blocksize To 1 First - This message results when you attempt to enable descrete mode
collection with a transfer blocksize greater than one. The blocksize must be 1 (default value), when
using descrete mode collection.
Value Out Of Range - This message indicates that a number has been entered that is too large. For
example, even though the processor memory can access up to 64K less than this exists on the actual
MDR-2000. If the actual quantity is exceeded then this message results.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-1
Chapter 6
TROUBLESHOOTING
The purpose of this section is to review the various operational characteristics of the MDR-2000 to
assist in troubleshooting the more common problems. The MDR-2000 is a comprehensive device
designed for optimal Call Detail Recording storage and pre-processing of records. The units have a
proven track record of reliable operation but sometimes things do go wrong.
Problems are generally in one of four functional components; the PBX itself, cables, modems and
transmission equipment or the MDR-2000. The intrinsic diagnostic capabilities of the MDR-2000
make diagnosis of the problem straightforward.
6.1 Preliminary Considerations
When troubleshooting MDR-2000 problems it is important to review the nature of the device and its
role in the data collection process.
The MDR-2000 is typically used as a ‘slave’ device. In this role it performs the following:
· Captures data sent to it from the PBX but does not send any communications to the PBX
· Pre-processes CDR data and stores it for later retrieval. Image (or non-CDR data) can be
optionally stored, but no processing is performed.
· Responds to commands from the downstream data collection processor by sending these
preprocessed records. It does not initiate communications and only responds when prompted by
specific commands.
The key to understanding the role the MDR-2000 plays is that it does not usually initiate
communications with the outside world (except in its role as an Alarm Annunciator).
Further, he communications ports do not use any flow control or hardware signaling. Therefore
external communications devices such as modems and multiplexors must be configured not to expect
control signals from the MDR-2000. In addition, these devices must be data transparent. Modems or
multiplexors that respond to ‘XON/OFF’ or ‘ACK/NAK’ type protocols may erroneously detect such
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-2
signals. This is because the MDR-2000 uses checksums and byte counts in its protocol with the
downstream processing facility which may inadvertently have these character values.
With this background, if communications with the PBX is problematic or there are difficulties
downloading data the following should be reviewed:
· Make sure a cable connections are secure, and that the cables are the correct type. The cable from
the MDR-2000 to the PC must be a ‘direct’ cable, the cable from the MDR-2000 to a modem must
be a ‘null modem’ cable (the null modem cable is usually provided).
· Make sure PBX is generating output. Often the cable to the PBX is not installed correctly or the
serial port on the PBX is disabled.
· Make sure communications port settings are correct. The default in the MDR-2000 is 1200 Baud,
8 data bits, no parity.
· Make sure communications link with downstream processing facility is data transparent. Disable
any flow control or handshaking that might be in place.
· If the MDR-2000 is responding to commands from a terminal program, but is not collecting data
from the PBX, use the ‘DU’ command which will cause any data received from the PBX to be
dumped, unedited, on the terminal. This will confirm that the data flow is setup correctly, and the
problem is a record formatting problem.
6.2 Physical Examination
When examining the MDR-2000 physically the first step is to ensure that all cables and power cords
are properly secured.
On the modem the terminal ready indicator and the modem clear indicator should be on. On the MDR-
2000 itself, LED RUN (CR9) should be on. If it is not, and no other LED’s are on, then the MDR-
2000 is totally inoperable. Check to ensure that power has been applied to the MDR-2000.
If LED RUN is on, and LED BMT (CR6) is on then the unit is operating and there are no call records
stored in the unit. When LED BMT is extinguished the unit is properly collecting calls. On new
installations it is sometimes a problem to get proper call recording established due to variances in the
PBX record format. LED BMT is the key to determining when the problem is resolved.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-3
If LED BMT is not extinguished check the PBX transmitter LED which is labeled PBX (CR5). It
should flicker as data is transmitted from the PBX to the MDR-2000. In addition, INT (CR8) and
RUN (CR9) will also flicker, as the data is transmitted. If LED PBX is being activated then the PBX is
sending data to the MDR-2000 but the MDR-2000 is rejecting the data. Check the PBX port Baud
rate to ensure that its setting matches that of the PBX.
If the Baud rates are correct it is necessary to check that the correct generic of MDR-2000 ROM is
installed or that the PBXs CDR option is correctly programmed.
If the above analysis indicates that the ROM may be the problem then a terminal must be used to
evaluate the performance of the ROM. This will reveal clues to the source of the problem, and will be
discussed in the following section under Remote Examination.
Failure of the unit to collect data or the LED’s to indicate any data capture activity may result from
cable or serial I/O port problems, including incorrect Baud rate, parity or byte size settings.
LED ERR (CR4) is the MDR-2000 hardware error indicator. It will be permanently on if an
unexpected hardware problem has occurred, or if during transmission of data to the host a memory
error has been detected. Generally this indicator is a warning that the hardware has malfunctioned.
However, unless it is accompanied by some of the other problems discussed in this section, it can be
ignored until preventative maintenance is convenient. CR4 is reset by the ‘SM’ command.
Finally, a brief note on LED’s INT and RUN. LED RUN is illuminated when the MDR-2000 is not
handling input or output over its communications ports. INT is illuminated when there is a hardware
interrupt in progress. Hardware interrupts occur when there is activity over the input or output ports.
In general when INT is illuminated, RUN will not be, and visa versa. If INT is constantly on then the
MDR-2000 is being inundated with interrupt requests, this is not the normal mode of operation.
6.3 Interactive Examination
To perform an interactive examination dial the MDR-2000 or connect a terminal directly to a local
MDR-2000 or via modem. Access the Interactive Monitor by entering the following sequence on the
terminal; ^VIM<Enter>.
Use the Ident command to confirm the name of the PBX generic supported by the ROM to ensure that
this is in fact the correct MDR-2000 ROM for this PBX. The is sample output from an Ident
command:
MDR-2000 Plus
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-4
Meridian 1 Generic
Rev. 3.S34.G41
Ser. 003423
Copyright (c) 2001 MDR Switchview
The revision level consists of three parts, the major revision number, specific edit level and general edit
level. By comparing these edit levels of the installed MDR-2000 to those of the latest revisions
available from MDR Technologies it can be quickly ascertained as to whether the problems being
encountered are due to the missing edits. If so then a new ROM must be installed with the latest
revisions.
Use the Status command to determine if any records are stored in the unit, the communications port
settings and the data collection/filtering settings. An example of the Status command output is shown
below:
Date/Time (mm/dd hh:mm): 01/01 00:01 Option Settings: NLN
Number of Records Stored: 0 Records to be Collected: 0
Port Config (PBX/Modem): 1200-8-N/ 1200-8-N Minimum Duration: 0
Incoming Calls: Yes Minimum Digits: 0
CDR Collection: Yes Image Collection: No
Meter Pulse Detection: No Multi Tenant Detection: No
Tandem Conversion Option: No Internal Calls (Ext->Ext): No
Last Scan Error Position: 0 Alarm Threshold: 0
Port Reset Timer: 15 Idle PBX Alarm Threshold: 0
Logical Error Count: 0 Alarm Enabled: No
Buffer Memory Size: 128K I/O Interrupt Status: Clear
Site Name: Site #:
Primary Alarm Phone No:
Secondary Alarm Phone No:
The ‘Number of Records Stored’ indicates the total number of records retained by the MDR-2000.
The ‘Records to be Collected’ field specifies how may of those records have been collected. Typically
when data collection is completed both values will be zero and begin incrementing as records are
received from the PBX. If the values are different it likely indicates that the downstream data
collection process was aborted for some reason. The computer-to-computer command ‘CL’ will
erase the collected records so that both values will be the same.
The Logical Error Count setting indicates that memory parity errors were detected when certain
records were prepared for transmission to the downstream data collection system. This is not a
transmission problem but rather an MDR-2000 memory problem.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-5
Check all of the settings that control the filtering of the data to ensure that records are not being
inadvertently being discarded. For example, if ‘Minimum Digits’ is set to 15 then virtually all of the
calls may be discarded. The fields to check are:
Minimum Duration
Minimum Digits
CDR Collection
Image Collection
Use the Customize command to list the preprogrammed settings and the selection or custom string
which is being used. An example is shown below:
Choices Are:
#1 --> 10,18,0,38,44,50,26,0,0,59,0,0,0,0,56,12,7,0
#2 --> 10,19,0,28,34,40,0,0,0,49,0,0,0,0,0
#3 --> 10,18,0,36,42,48,0,0,0,57,0,0,0,0,0
#4 --> 10,18,0,26,32,38,0,0,0,47,0,0,0,0,0
#5 --> 10,17,0,31,37,43,0,0,0,52,0,0,0,0,0
#6 --> 10,17,0,24,30,36,0,0,0,45,0,0,0,0,0
#7 --> 10,19,0,35,41,47,0,0,0,56,0,0,0,0,0
#8 --> 10,18,0,38,44,50,26,0,0,59,0,0,0,0,0,12,7,0
#9 --> 10,18,0,38,44,50,26,0,0,59,0,0,0,0,2,12,7,0
Cur> #1
New>
Refer to the section on the Customize command to make sure that the format of the CDR data from
the PBX closely matches that as defined by the Customize string. In general, Customize #1 matches
the CDR data most commonly encountered for each PBX generic.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-6
The next command which can be used to verify the operation of the MDR-2000 is the maintenance
command which is invoked by entering the Show Maint command. This command outputs
information which resembles the following:
000001 000001 000001 Rev. 3.S34.G41 003423 05 00 01 00 256
There are 10 individual fields displayed by the maintenance command each of which is described
below:
Field # Example Description
1 000001 Next free address in the buffer memory. The next record
received from the PBX will be stored beginning at this
location.
2 000001 The next full address in the buffer memory. If this value is
equal to the next free address then the MDR-2000 is empty.
3 000001 The current address in the buffer memory. This is the location
advanced to with the ‘OK’ command.
4 Rev. 3.S34.G41 The software revision currently installed.
5 003423 The hardware serial number uniquely identifying this MDR-
2000.
6 05 This is value of the LED’s at the moment the Show Maint
command is executed. The value of ERR can be determined
from this output.
7 00 This is a decimal value which indicates the character position
(beginning with 1) where records are being discarded due to
format non-conformance.
8 01 This is a hexadecimal value indicating the number of
unexpected interrupts at vector 38H. These are generally I/O
interrupts. This value is cleared by the ‘SM’ or Show Maint
commands.
9 00 This is a hexadecimal value indicating the selection of the ‘Set
Descrete Collection Functions’ command. ‘00’ indicates that
it is disabled, ‘FF’ indicates that Descrete Mode is on.
10 256 This is a decimal value indicating the buffer memory capacity
in ‘K’. This example indicates a 256K buffer.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-7
The information provided by the Maintenance command should correspond exactly with that of the
Interactive Monitor. If data has been stored, but is no longer being recorded, and the first three values
are ‘000001’ then the unit has been reset. Resets are typical of a catastrophic hardware or software
malfunction that might result from a sudden electrical discharge. Sources of these are power surges
and static discharge. Temporarily turning the unit off will also cause a reset as will the operator-tooperator
‘MR’ command.
Run the various onboard diagnostics available on the MDR-2000. These will detect solid hardware
malfunctions, but are unlikely to detect intermittent faults. Refer to the section of the Test commands
for details.
6.4 Reporting A Problem
When reporting a problem to MDR or your service representative it is important to have adequate
information available. Following information is required if an accurate and timely problem resolution is
to be achieved:
· EPROM revision information from the Interactive Monitor’s Ident command.
· Status information from the Interactive Monitor’s Status command.
· The external serial number which is found on the rear of the unit.
· The model of the PBX being monitored and the generic of software in use. Include any software
settings that affect the CDR output of the PBX.
· Output from the Customize command showing the individual field settings or the customize string
selection.
· A sample of CDR output from the PBX on diskette. This is extremely important in diagnosing
obscure problems since PBX output may vary from the published specifications. If not available on
diskette then hardcopy output is acceptable.
· Results from the MDR-2000 Test commands; Test NVR and Test Ram.
· Details on the modems, multiplexors or other transmission equipment begin used. Include model
numbers, speeds and any special or unusual features that are being used.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Troubleshooting
6-8
· The version and model of downstream processing software being used for polling (i.e. MDR-
5000).
· Provide your name, company, telephone number and fax number so that you can be contacted if
additional information is required.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Hardware
7-1
Chapter 7
HARDWARE
The purpose of this section is to describe the functional components of the MDR-2000 hardware. As
well a description of the cable requirements is provided.
7.1 Hardware Overview
The MDR-2000 is a Z80 CPU based system with 64K bytes of processor memory (RAM) and 128K
to 8MB of buffer memory. There are two RS232-C serial ports each capable of transmitting and
receiving at speeds from 300 Baud to 19200 Baud.
In addition, there is provision for a 128K-bit ROM, which overlays the first 16K of processor memory.
Clock interrupts are available on the MDR-2000 and are used to drive certain housekeeping routines
such as the internal timestamp and interval timers. Output is driven on a polled basis, and input is
interrupt driven through vector 38H.
An additional keepalive circuit is provided which generates an interrupt at vector 66H if it is not reset
by the software. In the event of a hardware or software malfunction this feature would assure that the
MDR-2000 was restarted automatically. The reset is performed by directing a single byte of output to
the appropriate I/O address.
The MDR-2000 requires a single 110VAC outlet to supply its internal power supply. This power
supply is used to provide the requirements for the MDR-2000 as well as keep its battery backup fully
charged. In the event of a power disruption, the MDR-2000 has sufficient battery capacity for about
60 minutes of operation.
The unit is housed in a single cabinet and requires no cooling fans or external climate except for that
found in the normal office or communications room environment.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Hardware
7-2
7.2 Cables
The MDR-2000 is designed to connect directly to a PBX through use of the MDR-2000 PBX port,
and directly to a modem using the MDR-2000 modem port. For this reason the PBX port is wired as a
serial terminal (DTE) and the modem port as a modem (DCE). The following paragraphs describe the
cabling required for the two ports under different circumstances.
The cable from the PBX to the MDR-2000 is provided by the local telephone equipment supplier. The
connector made available for use on the MDR-2000 must be a male DB25-P EIA connector with pins
labeled 1 through 25. This is the most commonly used connector configuration for EIA RS232-C
interfaces.
The connector pins must be wired as follows:
Pin Description
1 Protective ground.
2 Transmitted data from MDR-2000.
3 Received data from PBX
4 Request to send (RTS).
5 Clear to send (CTS).
6 Data set ready (DSR).
7 Signal ground.
20 Data terminal ready (DTR).
Any pins not designated should not be used. The cable can be inserted directly into the female PBX
port on the MDR-2000.
The MDR-2000 modem port must be connected either to the host computer system or a modem. The
cable provided with the MDR-2000 is a null modem configuration which is used for the modem to
MDR-2000 connection.
The cable supplied has DB25-P connectors at each end. The correspondence between pins at each end
is listed in the table below:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Hardware
7-3
DB25 Pin DB25 Pin
1 1
2 3
3 2
4 6
5 20
6 4
7 7
20 5
A straight cable (customer provided) must be used when connecting the MDR-2000 directly to a host
system. In this case the 8 pins listed above would have a one-to-one correspondence.
On some computer systems the communications port will have a 9 pin connector (DB9) instead of the
25 pin connector (DB25). In these cases the wiring of the cable must conform to the following table:
DB9 Pin DB25 Pin
1 8
2 3
3 2
4 20
5 7
6 6
7 4
8 5
9 22
Cable length depends on the type of cable used and on the environment through which the cable is
placed. In electromagnetically noisy areas, such as factory floors and elevator shafts, cables of shorter
length must be used. With longer cables the quality of the transmission deteriorates and the
information sent is sometimes made corrupt by the external noise.
Generally the MDR-2000 will be located in the equipment room or next to the host computer system
or modem. Therefore only one of the two connecting cables need be longer than a few feet. The
maximum cable length specified by the RS232-C standard is 50 feet, however experience has shown
that the following table specifies the actual practical length of cable that can be used for various Baud
rates:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Hardware
7-4
Baud Rate Shielded (Feet)
300 5000
1200 3000
2400 1000
4800 1000
9600 250
The shielded cable used in the above table is 22 AWG twisted pairs each with overall shield equivalent.
Note that information was not available on the maximum distance for 19200 Baud communications.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Appendix A
A-1
Appendix A
ASCII Equivalents
Dec. Hex. ASCII Dec. Hex. ASCII
000 00 NUL 032 20 Space
001 01 SOH 033 21 !
002 02 STX 034 22 "
003 03 ETX 035 23 #
004 04 EOT 036 24 $
005 05 ENQ 037 25 %
006 06 ACK 038 26 &
007 07 BEL 039 27 '
008 08 BS 040 28 (
009 09 HT 041 29 )
010 0A LF 042 2A *
011 0B VT 043 2B +
012 0C FF 044 2C ,
013 0D CR 045 2D -
014 0E SO 046 2E .
015 0F SI 047 2F /
016 10 DLE 048 30 0
017 11 DC1 049 31 1
018 12 DC2 050 32 2
019 13 DC3 051 33 3
020 14 DC4 052 34 4
021 15 NAK 053 35 5
022 16 SYN 054 36 6
023 17 ETB 055 37 7
024 18 CAN 056 38 8
025 19 EM 057 39 9
026 1A SUB 058 3A :
027 1B ESC 059 3B ;
028 1C FS 060 3C <
029 1D GS 061 3D =
030 1E RS 062 3E >
031 1F US 063 3F ?
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Appendix A
A-2
Dec. Hex. ASCII Dec. Hex. ASCII
064 40 @ 096 60 `
065 41 A 097 61 a
066 42 B 098 62 b
067 43 C 099 63 c
068 44 D 100 64 d
069 45 E 101 65 e
070 46 F 102 66 f
071 47 G 103 67 g
072 48 H 104 68 h
073 49 I 105 69 i
074 4A J 106 6A j
075 4B K 107 6B k
076 4C L 108 6C l
077 4D M 109 6D m
078 4E N 110 6E n
079 4F O 111 6F o
080 50 P 112 70 p
081 51 Q 113 71 q
082 52 R 114 72 r
083 53 S 115 73 s
084 54 T 116 74 t
085 55 U 117 75 u
086 56 V 118 76 v
087 57 W 119 77 w
088 58 X 120 78 x
089 59 Y 121 79 y
090 5A Z 122 7A z
091 5B [ 123 7B {
092 5C \ 124 7C |
093 5D ] 125 7D }
094 5E ^ 126 7E ~
095 5F _ 127 7F DEL
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
User Notes
B-1
Appendix B
User Notes

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