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NorstarOption (TechnicalUser)
31 May 06 18:03
How do I check what's the ip address assigned to the cdr box so I can access it?
acewarlock (TechnicalUser)
31 May 06 18:25
The only MDR2000 i've seen are serial, no IP.
Telecomlady (Programmer)
31 May 06 20:48
I agree. The MDR2000 that we had was serial with a direct connect. Is it for MAT?
GR8NORTH (Programmer)
1 Jun 06 12:56
MDR2000e has a IP network port.

Just telnet to it, login, and ...

You'll have to go in via the serial port. The MDR web site might have a downloadable manual.
aweshucks (TechnicalUser)
1 Jun 06 13:54
MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage Unit
User’s Reference Manual
(Major Release 3)
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc. MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in
accordance with the terms of such license.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not supplied by
MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc. or its affiliated companies.
The information in this manual reflects version 3.S01.G44 of the MDR-2000 software.
Copyright (c) 1990 - 2001 by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
All rights reserved.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
FCC Class B Digital Device or Peripheral - User’s Notice
Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of
the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Warning
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by MDR Switchview Global Networks Inc.
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Overview
2.1 Description .............................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2 Feature Cross-Reference ......................................................................................... 2-4
Chapter 3 Data Collection
3.1 CDR Data Collection .............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1.1 Input/Output Records ............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1.2 Data Selection ......................................................................................................... 3-5
3.1.3 Data Translation ..................................................................................................... 3-6
3.2 Alarm Annunciation ................................................................................................ 3-6
3.3 External Alarm Generation ..................................................................................... 3-8
3.4 Internal Alarm Generation ......................................................................................... 3-8
3.5 Modem Setup ........................................................................................................ 3-9
Chapter 4 Communications
4.1 Computer-To-Computer Commands ...................................................................... 4-1
4.2 Protocol .................................................................................................................. 4-5
4.3 Discrete Polling ....................................................................................................... 4-7
4.4 Large Blocksize Polling ............................................................................................ 4-8
4.5 Data Transmission .................................................................................................. 4-9
4.6 LED Indicators ....................................................................................................... 4-9
Chapter 5 Interactive Monitor
5.1 Command Processor ............................................................................................... 5-1
5.2 Command Descriptions ........................................................................................... 5-2
5.2.1 Set Command Details ............................................................................................. 5-9
5.2.2 Show Command Details ....................................................................................... 5-15
5.2.3 Customize Command Details ................................................................................ 5-16
5.2.4 Digits Table Command Details ............................................................................. 5-18
5.2.5 Alarm Table Command Details ............................................................................. 5-19
5.2.6 Test Command Details .......................................................................................... 5-20
5.3 Messages .............................................................................................................. 5-20
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Table of Contents
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6.1 Preliminary Considerations ..................................................................................... 6-1
6.2 Physical Examination .............................................................................................. 6-2
6.3 Interactive Examination .......................................................................................... 6-3
6.4 Reporting A Problem ................................................................................................ 6-7
Chapter 7 Hardware
7.1 Hardware Overview ................................................................................................ 7-1
7.2 Cables ..................................................................................................................... 7-2
Appendix A ASCII Equivalents
Appendix B User Notes
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Introduction
1-1
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
This manual describes the operational characteristics of the MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage Unit. All
aspects of the operational capability of the MDR-2000 are covered including details for unit setup,
operation and trouble shooting.
Generally reference to this manual will only be required when programming applications software to
interface with the MDR-2000. This information is provided in chapter 4. In addition, reference during
field setup may be required to properly adjust the option settings. This information is found in chapters
3, 5, 6 and 7. Chapter 5 provides details on the Interactive Monitor used for remote setup of the unit.
Chapter 6 provides details on troubleshooting and chapter 7 on the cabling conventions.
For information on sizing the MDR-2000 to meet anticipated storage requirements please refer to the
document entitled ‘MDR-2000 Data Collector Capacity Calculations’. Electrical, physical and
environmental specifications are provided on the MDR-2000 Data Collector brochure. Both of these
documents are available from MDR or your MDR Distributor.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-1
Chapter 2
OVERVIEW
The purpose of this section is to provide a general description of the MDR-2000 Intelligent Storage
Unit. Each of the features discussed in this section will be further described in later sections of the
manual.
2.1 Description
The MDR-2000 is a compact, highly versatile data collection device. It is designed for maintenance
free operation with reliability features to ensure data integrity and low support and service costs.
The MDR-2000 can be installed quickly. It requires a minimum of space and has no environmental
requirements other than those normally found in the office or equipment room.
Once in operation the MDR-2000 will collect call detail record (CDR) data and optionally image data
from the PBX for later transmission and downstream processing. As part of the data collection
process, the MDR-2000 formats the call detail records into an Expanded MDR Standard Record
format. The use of the Expanded MDR Standard Record format means that records collected from
different types of PBXs are presented in a consistent format to simplify downstream processing.
As part of the formatting process, call records can be retained or discarded based on the number of
digits dialed, the duration of the call, and whether it is incoming or internal. This feature facilitates
discarding of incomplete calls and local calls. By varying these parameters fine tuning of the collected
data is made possible. In addition, the MDR-2000 will deduct the duration selected from the time
reported for each call. This feature assists downstream processing accuracy by eliminating circuit
connection and ringing delays.
When collecting maintenance records the MDR-2000 can be set up to report alarms or error conditions.
On these systems the MDR-2000 is used to record this information and optionally alert a
downstream processing facility when preprogrammed alarms occur.
The MDR-2000 is microprocessor based. This approach provides flexibility in keeping the MDR-2000
current with PBX manufacturers’ changing specifications. It also means reliability and maintainability.
The MDR-2000 has diagnostic features to aid in problem determination. As well, keep-alive circuitry
and battery backup are provided to ensure that the MDR-2000 keeps running during power failures.
The MDR-2000 communicates with the PBX via an RS232-C compatible port. Communications with
downstream processing facilities is made possible by using another RS232-C port via direct connection
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-2
or modem. The MDR-2000 can be setup to communicate at speeds up to 19200 Baud, but is limited
by the data capability of the downstream facilities to accept the data at the higher speeds, the modem
equipment and the quality of the transmission lines.
To ensure data integrity, the data transmitted to the downstream processing unit is encapsulated in a
data packet. The packet contains byte count and checksum information to provide error detection
capability. If an error is detected by the software the MDR-2000 is requested to send the packet again.
This feature is important in ensuring the integrity of the downstream report processing.
While the MDR-2000 is transferring data downstream it continues to collect and process information
from the PBX. This facility means that prime-time data collection from the MDR-2000 is practical.
The unique design of the MDR-2000 incorporates the use of hardware and software to isolate internal
data integrity violations. This means that the data stored in the MDR-2000 is interrogated upon
transmission to downstream facilities to ensure that what was originally stored in the MDR-2000’s
large buffer memory is in fact unaltered when selected for transmission.
Commands by the downstream processing unit to the MDR-2000 or by technicians for remote
diagnosis are very simple. Commands exist in two command structures, computer-to-computer and
interactive.
By using groups of computer-to-computer commands the MDR-2000 will perform all of the functions
necessary for automatic data collection. These commands provide the functionality listed below.
Communications Commands:
o Send the current record or block of records to the downstream processing system.
o Advance to the next record or block of records.
o Clear all of the previously transmitted records. This command makes room for new records.
o Reset to the beginning of the buffer. This command helps recover records lost due to downstream
processing failures.
o Doorbell. This command returns a simple ‘Hello’ response to ensure that a connection to the
MDR-2000 has been made.
o Specify which type of records to transmit, CDR or Image records, or both.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-3
Maintenance/Support Commands:
o Pass data from the PBX to the communications port for dynamic monitoring of PBX activity.
Data is still processed and retained by the MDR-2000.
o Send a maintenance record consisting of pointer values, indicator LED values, serial number, and
memory size over the communications port.
o Send an ASCII test sequence over the communications port.
o Commands to reset the MDR-2000’s PBX port, the entire MDR-2000, or the MDR-2000 buffer
memory.
o Test commands to verify the integrity of stored data and check the RAM memories.
o View the last record rejected by the MDR-2000.
o Send an MDR-2000 identification message indicating the PBX type, MDR-2000 generic, and
software revision and serial number.
o Enter the Interactive Monitor (Described later in this document).
The interactive commands are provided by a software module called the Interactive Monitor. It
provides most of the functionality described above but in a more humanly engineered format. Its
purpose is for operational control of the unit. All options are set by the Interactive Monitor to provide
complete control and configuration of the MDR-2000 remotely.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-4
2.2 Feature Cross-Reference
The following table is a feature cross-reference for the more popular PBX and keysystems. It specifies
the call record characteristics by PBX. The terms ‘n/a’ or ‘No’ in the table mean that the feature is not
supported by the PBX or that the MDR-2000 does not currently support it (Usually due to a lack of
information about the PBX data format).
There are many PBX and keysystems on the market sold under various brand names and features can
vary by country, supplier and revision. The MDR-2000 is continually being revised and updated as
new PBXs are supported and features of existing PBXs change. If the PBX or keysystem in question
is not on this list, or you have questions about the information in the table, please contact MDR for the
latest available status.
MDR-2000/PBX Feature Cross-Reference
(Part 1 of 2)
PBX Type Digits
Dialed
Account
Code
Digits
Auth.
Code
Digits
Access
Code
Suppr.
Duration
Accuracy
(Secs)
Meter
Pulse
Ring
Time
Amtelco Generic 16 8 8 Yes 6 No No
AT&T Legend/Merlin 18 n/a 16 No 1 No No
AT&T 75 15 5 7 Yes 6 No No
CBX-I/CBX-II See Rolm-8000/Rolm-9000
Citation 28 8 n/a No 1 No No
Dimension FP Series 18 5 7 Yes 6 No No
Ericsson MD110 20 15 6 Yes 6 Yes Yes
Focus II/III 20 15 n/a Yes 1 No No
Fujitsu 9600 25 15 6 Yes 1 Yes No
Fujitsu Starlog 20 15 n/a Yes 1 No No
GTD-1000 20 8 n/a No 1 No No
GTD Omni 20 11 n/a No 60 No No
Hitachi EX-10 15 n/a n/a Yes 6 No No
IDS-128 26 6 n/a No 60 No No
InterTel 32/128 24 8 n/a No 60 No No
iSDX V2.x Series 18 8 n/a Yes 1 Yes Yes
Isotech 36 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Overview
2-5
MDR-2000/PBX Feature Cross-Reference
(Part 2 of 2)
PBX Type Digits
Dialed
Account
Code
Digits
Auth.
Code
Digits
Access
Code
Suppr.
Duration
Accuracy
(Secs)
Meter
Pulse
Ring
Time
ITT 3100L 15 5 7 Yes 6 No No
Iwatsu 26 12 n/a No 60 Yes No
Lexar 18 10 10 Yes 6 No No
Lucent Generic 14 14 6 Yes 1 No No
Meridian 1 Series 28 10 10 No 2 No No
Mitel SX Series 23 12 n/a No 1 Yes Yes
Mercury-1000 16 6 4 Yes 1 No No
Neax-12A 15 5 n/a Yes 6 No No
Neax-2400 24 10 8 Yes 1 No No
Nec Electra 22 14 n/a No 1 No No
Norstar 28 10 n/a No 2 No No
Panasonic Keysystems 36 8 n/a No 1 Yes No
Perception 18 12 n/a Yes 1 No No
Phillips VOX 16 8 6 Yes 1 Yes No
Plessey K1 12 6 n/a No 1 No No
Plessey K2 16 6 n/a Yes 1 No No
Prodigy 21 10 n/a Yes 6 No No
Rockwell Galaxy 16 6 n/a No 1 Yes Yes
Rolm 8000 15 10 n/a Yes 60 No No
Rolm 9000 16 10 12 Yes 6 No No
Siemens Saturn Series 16 11 4 Yes 1 Yes No
Siemens SD192 15 4 n/a No 60 No No
Toshiba Strata Series 28 8 n/a No 1 No No
Telrad 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
Tie 16/48 22 9 n/a No 1 No No
Tie 24/64 19 n/a n/a No 1 No No
Tie Meritor 16 8 n/a No 1 No No
Tie Ultracom 16 8 n/a No 60 No No
Trillium Panther 20 12 n/a No 1 No No
Vantage-48 20 10 n/a No 1 No No
Voldavi Series 22 9 n/a No 60 No No
Win Comm. Generic 18 11 11 No 60 No No
580 DSS 22 7 n/a Yes 1 No No
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-1
Chapter 3
DATA COLLECTION
The purpose of this section is to describe the data collection process as well as the contents and format
of the data used by the MDR-2000.
3.1 CDR Data Collection
This section describes the details of call detail record collection on the MDR-2000. It covers the
conversion of PBX CDR records to Expanded MDR Standard Format, the available data selection
options, and the data translation defaults that are used.
Information on the Expanded MDR Standard Format is provided to assist in downstream processing
applications.
All data is collected from the PBXs over a 300 to 19200 Baud, RS232-C compatible port. This is
generally achieved by requesting the PBX supplier to enable the port on the PBX. In general, the PBX
CDR port must be configured for a standalone hardcopy terminal. That is how the MDR-2000 looks
to the PBX.
3.1.1 Input/Output Records
A variety of PBXs are supported by the MDR-2000 and new ones are added to the list as required.
Each individual PBX requires a custom ROM (Read-Only Memory) chip for that PBX generic. The
differences that exist between ROM versions is entirely limited to the translation software. The
translation software is that component of the MDR-2000 that converts PBX specific data into the
Expanded MDR Standard Format CDR records.
Each record sent from the PBX is terminated by, or preceded by, a carriage-return/linefeed pair, and
one or more of the following characters; NUL, DEL, DC1, DC2, or DC3. These special characters are
ignored, the carriage-return is required.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-2
The following information must be output by the PBX in order for it to be a suitable device for MDR-
2000 and downstream processing:
Field Name Description Minimum
Size
Maximum
Size
ORGID The originating trunk/extension. 1 7
TERID The destination trunk/extension. 1 7
STARTIME The time the call began. 4 6
DATE The date of the call. 4 6
DURATION The length of the call. 4 6
METER Meter pulses (where applicable). 0 5
RING Ring time (where applicable). 0 3
DIGITS The actual digits dialed. 0 PBX Max.
ACCOUNT An optional account code. 0 14
AUTHCODE An optional authorization code. 0 10
The time fields are in a format that provides for hours, minutes and seconds. If seconds are not
available then the accuracy of the reported data will be to the minute. The MDR-2000 defaults
unavailable seconds fields to zero.
The date field requires month and day, or the Julian date which is the day of the year. The year field is
not used.
In the digits field there is no absolute minimum. However, if digits dialed are not output then the CDR
information is of limited value in downstream processing applications. The MDR-2000 can be
programmed to accept as few digits as required.
Any records that do not match the format as described in the PBX specific ROM will be discarded.
The MDR-2000 provides no error recovery for corrupt records from the PBX.
The output record from the MDR-2000 is in Expanded MDR Standard Format which is described in
the following table:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-3
Field Name Starting
Position
Length
(Bytes)
Type Comments
Record Type 1 A X or B
Record Number 2 3 9 Modulo 1000
Customer Number 5 2 9 Usually 00
ID Type 7 1 A T, D, A or I
Originating ID 8 7 9
ID Type 15 1 A T, D or A
Terminating ID 16 7 9
Date 23 4 D mmdd
Time 27 4 9 hhmm
Duration 31 6 T hhmmss
Flag Byte 37 1 9 (0 - 7)
Meter Pulse 38 5 9
Digits 43 9 See Notes Below
ID Type: The ID type field indicates the type of originator or terminator of a call. ‘T’ for trunk, ‘D’ for
extension, or ‘A’ for attendant. If the ID type for the Originating ID is an ‘I’ then this record is an
image record and not a CDR record.
Flag: The Flag Byte is PBX specific and is designed to provide additional information about the call
record. It is presented as a single digit from 0 - 7 which is interpreted as a bit pattern. Flag byte
definitions are PBX specific, and as such may change depending on the PBX, the following bit
definitions which have been assigned are; Bit 0 (Hex 1) indicates an expensive route was detected by
the PBX, Bit 1 (Hex 2) indicates the call utilized the Answer Supervision capability, and Bit 2 (Hex 4)
indicates that the call record was a transfer from an original call.
Meter Pulse: The Meter Pulse field will always be zero on systems which do not utilize the Meter
Pulse feature.
Digits Field: The digits field has a variable length limited by the capacity of the PBX digits dialed field.
This field also includes the ring time, account code, authorization code, and calling line identification
fields. These fields are made part of the digits field because of their greatly varying attributes among
different PBX’s. On smaller systems none of them may be found. The following paragraphs describe
each of the digits dialed subfields:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-4
Ring Time: The ring time, if present, will always be the first field in the digits dialed. It can be
detected by the presence of a ‘T’ which is followed by the 3 digit ring time in seconds. If no ‘T’ is
detected as the first character then there is no ring time field. Ring time is always reported if
supported by the PBX.
Account Code: The account code is separated from the digits dialed by an ‘#’. The position of the
account code may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing system must
parse the digits field for the ‘#’ and following digits.
Authorization Code: The authorization code is separated by a ‘A’. The position of the authorization
code may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing system must parse
the digits field for the ‘A’ and following digits.
Calling Line Identification: The calling line identification is denoted by a ‘D’. The position of the
calling line identification may vary, and its presence is optional, therefore the downstream processing
system must parse the digits field for the ‘D’ and following digits.
Fields are defined by their starting position in the record, the length in bytes and the type. Types are
one of the following:
A Alphabetic character (A through Z).
9 Numeric field (digits 0 through 9 and ‘.’).
T Time field in the format ‘hhmmss’.
D Date field in the format ‘ddmm’.
Variable Fields: There is potential for other fields to be included in some models of the MDR-2000
and in data streams used as input to downstream processing. To facilitate these fields the ‘I’ designator
in the Digits Dialed field has been employed.
If an ‘I’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field it will be followed by an indicator from ‘0’ to ‘9’. The
indicator specifies the type and length of the data to follow. Several indicators have been implemented
as of this writing, as follows:
When ‘I0’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field the three digits following it are the Hold Time for the
call. For example, if the string ‘I0002’ is found in the Digits Dialed field then this call has been on hold
for 2 seconds.
When ‘I1’ is detected in the Digits Dialed field the three digits following it are the Extended Duration
Hours digits for calls 100 hours and longer. These three digits concatenated with the two hour digits
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-5
on the duration field can be used to construct a duration field in the format of ‘99999:99:99’ for
downstream processing.
‘I9’ is an optional field terminator. ‘Ix’ fields can be terminated based on several criteria. Firstly,
the field may be of a fixed length, such as the ‘I0’ field. Secondly, the field may be at the end of the
Digits Dialed field and therefore is terminated by the end of the record. Thirdly, the field may be
variable length and have to be terminated by the presence of the ‘I9’ designator. In any event, any
parsing routines should always detect ‘I9’ or the end of the record as the end of the current field.
Other Notes: If the record type is ‘X’ then this indicates a normal Expanded MDR Standard Format
record. If the record type is ‘B’ then the MDR-2000 has detected an internal error on transmitting the
record that has resulted in the record’s contents being changed. The record can be discarded by the
host system to avoid processing errors. In addition the MDR-2000 error indicator (LED CR4) is
turned on. The presence of ‘B’ type records is symptomatic of a hardware malfunction in the MDR-
2000.
If the record type is an ‘N’ then this indicates an older MDR Standard Format record which will be
found in major release 1 and major release 2 version units. Please refer to the earlier MDR-2000
Reference Manual for details on this record format and the MDR-2000 capabilities.
3.1.2 Data Selection
As calls are received by the MDR-2000 they are scanned to ensure that they conform to the PBX
specific format. If they do, then they are translated to Expanded MDR Standard Format, compressed
and stored in the buffer storage.
Conformance includes two additional constraints. Firstly, the call duration must exceed the selected
‘Minimum Call Duration’, and secondly the number of digits dialed must exceed the ‘Minimum Digits
Dialed’ value. These values are set using jumpers on the MDR-2000 or by commands to the
Interactive Monitor which are described later in this manual.
An exception to the ‘Minimum Digits Dialed’ constraint are those calls with digits dialed whose
beginning digits match the values set with the ‘DIGITS TABLE’ command in the Interactive Monitor.
These sequences ignore the ‘Minimum Digits Dialed’ constraint.
If records do not conform they are discarded or may be stored in image format if image collection is
enabled (see Interactive Monitor). Records that are discarded because they failed to meet the
minimum constraints but are otherwise in the correct format are not collected by the image collection
when discarded, only records that did not meet the PBX’s CDR format are saved.
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-6
3.1.3 Data Translation
The actual process of translating PBX specific records into Expanded MDR Standard Format is
relatively straight forward. Each field of an incoming record is analyzed as necessary to derive the
information for the output record. The translation is dependent on the PBX being supported. Any
fields which are not present, that can be defaulted, are set to specific values.
The customer number is defaulted to ‘00’, the record number is assigned a sequential 3 digit number,
and the auxiliary ID is defaulted to spaces. In addition, incomplete fields, such as a time field with no
seconds, has the seconds field set to ‘00’.
Finally, the originating and terminating ID fields are right justified and zero filled if they are shorter than
the maximum size. The digits dialed/account code field is terminated by a Carriage-Return/Linefeed
pair.
3.2 Alarm Annunciation
When alarms are enabled the Alarm Table (see Interactive Monitor, Set Alarm, Set Primary Phone, Set
Secondary Phone and Alarm Table commands for details) is scanned for each image record that is
processed. When an entry in the table matches the starting characters of the image record then the
repeat count for that entry is decremented. When the repeat count reaches zero it is reset and an alarm
is raised. The MDR-2000 will then use the telephone number stored with the Set Primary Phone and
Set Secondary Phone commands to dial a Hayes compatible modem and then dump an alarm message.
Note that these records are only retained in the MDR-2000’s buffer if image collection is enabled (See
Set Image command).
In order to successfully use this capability there must be a dedicated modem and computer at the
receiving end to accept the alarm message. The MDR-2000 will output the formatted message when
the modem at the receiving end answers the telephone.
The message is output with the standard MDR-2000 protocol layered around the alarm message as
follows:
MDR-2000 V3 User’s Reference Manual
Data Collection
3-7
Field # Example Description
1 X Record type ‘X’ for expanded record.
2 01/19 Date of the alarm taken from the MDR-2000 (mm/dd).
3 12:42 Time of the alarm taken from the MDR-2000 (hh:mm).
4 012345 MDR-2000 serial number.
5 01 Site Number of the MDR-2000 (see Set Site command).
6 REMOTE1 Site Name of the MDR-2000 (see Set Name command). This field is
20 bytes in length, blank filled.
7 ERR009 Alarm code as generated by the PBX. The format is variable
depending on the PBX. The MDR-2000 outputs codes in the form
M2Kxxx: for internally detected alarm conditions.
8 Pwr. Failure Alarm description in freeform as output by the PBX.
The Alarm Code and description fields will contain the exact string that caused the alarm. The Site
Number field is used in cases where the receiving application may wish to poll the MDR-2000. This
enables the application to determine the files in which to store the alarm data.
Note that this record format is compatible with MDR’s Maintenance and Alarm Reporting System
(MARS) which is the downstream processing module used with the MDR-2000 alarm features.
The MDR-2000 follows a

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