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ollydee (IS/IT--Management)
28 Feb 05 22:47
This is an extension to my previous post.

For those of you who haven't read it - here is the scenario:
I'm fresh out of technical college. I don't have a degree as such, but along-side my diploma (PC/Network technician) I have the following certs: A+, Network+, and CCNA. I'm having a "career anxiety attack" right now as I can't seem to find the right path. Although my courses at technical college were helpful...I don't want to end up as a network administator, no offense to anyone that is.

After some more consideration, I am thinking maybe a degree in E-Business would be a safe bet. It would open up a lot of windows of opportunity - yet not tie me down to anything specific. What do you guys think? Is the salary of an "E-business degree holder" decent, and what are the predictions on job prospects for the next 5 years?
Also, do you think a degree in E-business would be all that much more valueable than being certified in it (CompTia)?
kHz (MIS)
28 Feb 05 23:41

Quote:


Is the salary of an "E-business degree holder" decent,
If you do any job for the money, you will be disappointed.  Money should not be your objective in finding a career, otherwise you will regret it.
ollydee (IS/IT--Management)
28 Feb 05 23:43
Sadly, I do agree... But what do the statistics say?

"Personally I am greatful to Microsoft for spitting out such buggy software, it keeps me employed."

alexhu (MIS)
1 Mar 05 5:06

Quote:

I can't seem to find the right path. ...........I don't want to end up as a network administator

Seems to me that you don't know what you want to do.

Why did you pick IT in the first place ?

Alex
johnherman (MIS)
1 Mar 05 11:54
Computerworld's annual salary survery

http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/salarysurvey2004/home?from=homepromo

-------------------------
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that noboby appreciates how difficult it was.
- Steven Wright

ollydee (IS/IT--Management)
1 Mar 05 12:57
I do want to work in IT, or at least with IT - that I'm sure of. All I know is that a career in networking certainly isn't for me... I'm not ready to be tied down to anything specific for the moment. And I do realize that the right career choice shouldn't be based on its average salary, but let's be honast - money IS a big issue when it comes to choosing a job.

Does any one here actually have experience with E-business? And I must pose my question yet again - is it a safe bet (do you think it would be for someone in my position)?

------------------------------------------
"Personally I am greatful to Microsoft for spitting out such buggy software, it keeps me employed."

kHz (MIS)
1 Mar 05 14:45
What do you mean by e-business?  That is a broad term.  I am a Unix sys admin and have worked a lot with web servers and java app servers for the companies I work for and that allowed me to work with MQSeries and DB2.  So yes, I have quite a bit of experience with the web.

I personally don't think you know what you want to do.

Quote:


I do want to work in IT, or at least with IT
Working in IT or with IT is a big difference.  A market researcher works with IT because they have to write reports and maybe create statistical programs.  

Quote:


I'm not ready to be tied down to anything specific for the moment
That's okay.  Most people have between 4-6 careers and something like 20 jobs in their working lifetime.  And no money is not a big issue for a lot of people when they choose their career.  Do you think an Army Ranger or Navy SEAL is doing their job for the money?  Do you think somebody who works in a factory their entire life does it for the money?  They may actually like what they do and the people they work with, and they earn enough to pay their bills and have a home, put food on the table, and clothe their kids.

Maybe you should invest some time and money in finding what you are suited for and what your interests are.  That might give you some insight.
ollydee (IS/IT--Management)
1 Mar 05 16:43

Quote:

Maybe you should invest some time and money in finding what you are suited for and what your interests are.  That might give you some insight.

How??? :/

I do enjoy working with computers for more than just "writing reports and creating statistical programs"... I must say I find programming on any level pretty boring (minus web design).

I wish all this didn't have to be so hard...

------------------------------------------
"Personally I am greatful to Microsoft for spitting out such buggy software, it keeps me employed."

kHz (MIS)
1 Mar 05 17:52
You could take the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, or the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator that will reveal your personality type and that will be revealing.

If your type comes back as the first of four (for example, I am an ISFJ) as an E (extrovert) then it may not be for you to sit behind a desk in relatively quiet and type on a keyboard.

Also, find out what type of learning style you have.  That way if the job you get requires certain knowledge, you will be able to learn the material in a method that suits you, and you can then benefit the company.

Read the book "What Color is your Parachute?" that will have you complete exercises to help you identify what you enjoy and don't enjoy.

I would say with your comment

Quote:


I wish all this didn't have to be so hard...
that you need to invest time in finding what you want to do.
russellbcopeland (Programmer)
2 Mar 05 10:01
You're just starting out. Right now is the best time to really look at finding a path that can make you happy. It has taken me years to get far enough along on my career path to achieve a level of happiness with it. If I had focused more on what I like to do and directed myself in that direction instead of just toward technology in general it would have taken a lot less time to get where I am today.

I think the most important thing is to find what you like to do and then investigate ways to exploit what you like to do to make the money you feel you need.

I wish I had some good career advice when I was younger.
johnherman (MIS)
3 Mar 05 10:01
e-business is NOT going to go away.

Exchanging data between businesses has been a major goal since the 1960's. It started with banks, mostly, sending or delivering magnetic tape reels.

E-business got a jump-start in the late 1980's with EDI (Electronic Data Interchange). This concept started with standard formats for transaction but was at the onset still tape delivery. As network capabilities increased, EDI files began traveling across modem or dedicated circuits.

The Internet awakening of the 1990's has continued to fuel the exchange of business information. WWWeb shopping, for instance.

-------------------------
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that noboby appreciates how difficult it was.
- Steven Wright

BocaBurger (Vendor)
3 Mar 05 13:59
Remember the saying: "The best laid plans..." I had a great job as an SE for a nice sized tech company, great products, good people to work for. One day we got bought out by a big company, and I was let go the next day (I was the #2 dollar producer in the US). Had to go looking in a so so job market. Got a good job at less pay working for a non-profit working for the state goverment as an IT project manager. Saved them tens of thousands of dollars. State forgot to fund my position in the next year's budget... back on the streets looking again. Wound up as MIS manager of a big RE company. I was working on Y2k, they were still in the 1980s technically, we parted ways in 3 months. Took my present job, even though I had never done anything specifically like this because the salary we good. 5.5 years into that company and it was bought. Now the product I work on might get phased out and I am now only 9 years from retirement.

Descisions, descisions...

BocaBurger
<===========================||////////////////|0
The pen is mightier than the sword, but the sword hurts more!

audiopro (Programmer)
8 Mar 05 9:42
Straight from Tech to earning top dollar - Do people not work their way up ladders these days?
My advice would be to get into IT at what ever level you can and work upwards.
Reach for the sky but start on the ground.

Keith
www.studiosoft.co.uk

BocaBurger (Vendor)
8 Mar 05 9:47
"Straight from Tech to earning top dollar" ??? I started in IT, as it was, in the late 1980's, on Northstars and Altos'.

How is that straight to top dollar?

BocaBurger
<===========================||////////////////|0
The pen is mightier than the sword, but the sword hurts more!

audiopro (Programmer)
8 Mar 05 10:03
Sorry - I didn't mean to cause offence.

but I read at the start of this thread:-


ollydee (IS/IT--Manageme)
'I'm fresh out of technical college'


I took this to mean, that this thread was started by someone who was fresh out of technical college.
My mistake - I only went to Grammar School.

Keith
www.studiosoft.co.uk

BocaBurger (Vendor)
8 Mar 05 10:07
No offence, I thought you were replying to my post. As least you didn't go to Public school.

My Grammar was a good teacher too


BocaBurger
<===========================||////////////////|0
The pen is mightier than the sword, but the sword hurts more!

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